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Seeking advice for pharmaceuticals in off-grid/wilderness med kit

alpine44

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Mar 23, 2010
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As the title states, I am seeking advice from the medical professionals on this forum for expanding my first-aid/urgent care kit.

I am well stocked and trained for dealing with traumatic injuries to the musculoskeletal apparatus in austere environments. I also have means and knowledge to address severe hemorrhages and penetrating chest wounds as much as one could expect from a layman. But there is a gap in my medical preparedness that became obvious recently when I experienced two medical issues that in themselves were not critical but severely reduced my ability to fend for myself. Fortunately, these incidents happened in "civilization" and not where they could have become a life-threatening problem.

The first incident was an acute corneitis on the left eye several months ago. My left eye is corrected, via a contact lens, for distant vision while the right eye is uncorrected for proximity focus. (This is called monovision and actually pretty cool since I can have both iron sights and target in focus with both eyes open and the brain merging the information.)
The result of the corneal inflammation in the left eye was that I had to remove the contact lens and could not focus any further than a few feet in bright daylight and that both eyes were watering profusely like having just cut some potent onions. Not a big deal when you are home but a serious problems when you HAVE to walk in the woods or drive in urban traffic. I tried an improvised eyepatch but the healthy eye was still watering like crazy adding to the already severe acuity degradation from loosing distant vision. And lets not forget the distraction from the pain, which was substantially more annoying than the worst tooth ache I ever experienced. A prescription eyedrop formulation containing an antibiotic and corticosteroid resolved the debilitating symptoms in less than an hour. It took a few more days before I could put the contact lens back in the left eye but the pharmaceutical intervention got me quickly "back in the fight".

I am currently recovering from the second hit that started with one of my terriers snuggling against my neck and face. Unfortunately for me, he must have just pursued some critter in poison ivy without me noticing it. Long story short, on day three both of my eyes were swollen shut and yours truly was down for the count again.

Luckily a friend and MD stopped by, saw my grotesquely disfigured face, prescribed Methylprednisolone (another corticosteroid) plus Benadryl and got it for me from the local pharmacy. Similarly to the experience with the corneal inflammation the debilitating symptoms receded within the first hour of taking the medicine and another hour later I can now type these words. I am going to stay off the wheel while taking the Benadryl but I could continue to hike and sustain my life outdoors at this point if needed.

What other scenarios are common that can easily be resolved with the right medicine but could otherwise lead to a critical debilitation? What pharmaceuticals should therefore be included in a medical kit for austere environments? (I can get the prescription for whatever is useful and pledge to learn and understand the use and contraindications similar to gaining the knowledge for applying mechanical and plumbing remedies.)

Mods: Please move this thread if there is a more suitable place than the pit.
 
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A varied regimen of antibiotics would be a good start. Personally, I'd add in a good stash of pain meds.

Good fucking luck getting any on those, especially the pain stuff. The medico's like to maintain tight control so they can insist on a paid visit. They use the excuse that they expire in a while. I'd rather have some expired ones than none at all. Or they could write a script that was refillable. Nope we want a paid visit.
 
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Just a reminder that the following comments and suggestions are not individual medical advice. They are merely suggestions that you HAVE TO discuss with your health care provider.


PS: I originally reserved this post space for a summary of the following suggestions, anticipating the typical thread creep of the pit. Fortunately, the posts are so far right on point and can be digested directly. Hope it stays that way.
 
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A varied regimen of antibiotics would be a good start. Personally, I'd add in a good stash of pain meds.

Good fucking luck getting any on those, especially the pain stuff. The medico's like to maintain tight control so they can insist on a paid visit. They use the excuse that they expire in a while. I'd rather have some expired ones than none at all. Or they could write a script that was refillable. Nope we want a paid visit.
Our state allows the sale of thc now. Ive never used the stuff, not even as a teen, but I do have a bottle of gummies in my go bag for just an event where pain could be an issue.

On that note, I do refresh my go bag every 6 months. I always carry it in my car too. I always refresh the bag, and smoke detector batteries on day light saving time. Reminder for those that need to refresh.

I also have tums, and imodium tablets in my bag.
 
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Back when we first started doing a TacMed class, you could often get your Dr. to write scrips and or provide samples of nice to have meds, not so much anymore. This place will setup kits for most purposes, though I still advise you consult your own family doctor to confirm what's right for you in the kit.
JASE Med Kits

This was my original list of meds for the DFAK. The Sched II stuff is pretty much unobtanium nowadays, OTC meds like Naproxsen will do in most cases. I still advise getting some Narcan for potential OD's even you you don't stock your own opioids. Locals are great for lots of stuff as well, if you can learn to apply a nerve block Marcaine will deal with some pretty severe pain for quite some time and is reasonably safe for a non-professional HCP. Antibiotics are nice to have, though one does need to understand how they work and what dosage is used for which suspected infection. The SOF Medical Handbook, Where There is No Doctor, Ditch Medicine and the old SF Medical Handbook will help you out there. This misc section has some handy stuff, like Zofran for nausea, epi/benedryl for allergic reactions, and IV fluids should be on hand for some antibiotic uses and general fluid replacement.

Definitely consult your Dr. on the antibiotics, allergic reactions and drug interactions can be fatal. This list is normally pretty universal, but I have no idea if your personal history supports the use of all of these.

Pain Meds - Schedule II Narcotics
Demerol (Meperidine)
Morphine
Valium (Diazepam)

Reversal agent for narcotic overdose
Narcan (Naloxone)

Local Anesthetics
Lidocaine
Marcaine

Antibiotics
Amoxicillin
Azithromycin
Ceftriaxone
Keflex (Cephalexin)
Cipro (Ciprofloxacin)
Levaquin (Levofloxacin)
Bactrim (Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim)
Flagyl (Metronidazole)
Erythromycin ointment

Misc
Prednisone
Epinephrine 1:10000
Benadryl (Diphenhydramine)
Zofran (Ondanestron)
Loperimide
Normal Saline, D5W (Dextrose 5% in Water) and Ringers Lactate IV bags
 
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Our state allows the sale of thc now. Ive never used the stuff, not even as a teen, but I do have a bottle of gummies in my go bag for just an event where pain could be an issue.

On that note, I do refresh my go bag every 6 months. I always carry it in my car too. I always refresh the bag, and smoke detector batteries on day light saving time. Reminder for those that need to refresh.

I also have tums, and imodium tablets in my bag.
I used them in the past and never found thc to be good for pain control. The best thing for that is the narcotics they wont lit you have. I understand that they can be addictive, but on the other hand look at it this way. THE GOVERNMENT HAS TAKEN AWAY YOUR RIGHT NOT TO HURT.
 
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Back when we first started doing a TacMed class, you could often get your Dr. to write scrips and or provide samples of nice to have meds, not so much anymore. This place will setup kits for most purposes, though I still advise you consult your own family doctor to confirm what's right for you in the kit.
JASE Medical Kits

This was my original list of meds for the DFAK. The Sched II stuff is pretty much unobtanium nowadays, OTC meds like Naproxsen will do in most cases. I still advise getting some Narcan for potential OD's even you you don't stock your own opioids. Locals are great for lots of stuff as well, if you can learn to apply a nerve block Marcaine will deal with some pretty severe pain for quite some time and is reasonably safe for a non-professional HCP. Antibiotics are nice to have, though one does need to understand how they work and what dosage is used for which suspected infection. The SOF Medical Handbook, Where There is No Doctor, Ditch Medicine and the old SF Medical Handbook will help you out there. This misc section has some handy stuff, like Zofran for nausea, epi/benedryl for allergic reactions, and IV fluids should be on hand for some antibiotic uses and general fluid replacement.

Definitely consult your Dr. on the antibiotics, allergic reactions and drug interactions can be fatal. This list is normally pretty universal, but I have no idea if your personal history supports the use of all of these.

Pain Meds - Schedule II Narcotics
Demerol (Meperidine)
Morphine
Valium (Diazepam)

Reversal agent for narcotic overdose
Narcan (Naloxone)

Local Anesthetics
Lidocaine
Marcaine

Antibiotics
Amoxicillin
Azithromycin
Ceftriaxone
Keflex (Cephalexin)
Cipro (Ciprofloxacin)
Levaquin (Levofloxacin)
Bactrim (Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim)
Flagyl (Metronidazole)
Erythromycin ointment

Misc
Prednisone
Epinephrine 1:10000
Benadryl (Diphenhydramine)
Zofran (Ondanestron)
Loperimide
Normal Saline, D5W (Dextrose 5% in Water) and Ringers Lactate IV bags
Your JASE link doesnt work for me.

Getting any sort of pain meds is like begging for snow in the desert. Consider, the government has taken away your right not to hurt. Fuck the government and fuck Joe Biden. Not much better luck with the antibiotics but I do agree you need to know a bit about them. I can take them all except one yu listed, the Sulfamethoxazole. If i take that in about 10 minutes I've got a wicked upset stomach and start shitting for days. Nasty stuff.
 
Your JASE link doesnt work for me.

Getting any sort of pain meds is like begging for snow in the desert. Consider, the government has taken away your right not to hurt. Fuck the government and fuck Joe Biden. Not much better luck with the antibiotics but I do agree you need to know a bit about them. I can take them all except one yu listed, the Sulfamethoxazole. If i take that in about 10 minutes I've got a wicked upset stomach and start shitting for days. Nasty stuff.
Link fixed. The online docs will prescribe everything except the narcotics.
 
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Link fixed. The online docs will prescribe everything except the narcotics.
What is the shelf like of the antibiotics if stored in an airtight container, cool, dark, dry?
 
As to storage.
Keep it cold....is my guess. Its where I keep mine. Except Iveemectin solution. It has temp range on bottle. Not sure if refrigerator Temps would help or hurt it.
 
OxyContin for pain
Avelox antibiotic for just about everything, including diverticulitis flare (my personal favorite)
Mometasone cream for poison oak

If you need more than that you might be fooked.




P
 
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I had poison oak once when I was 15. It was bad, everywhere, even in my mouth.
Struggled through for about a week of very sick.
I lived. No meds, no calamine, no steroids.

The upside. I can wallow in it now, might get a tiny blister between my fingers for a few days.
I have to be careful the wife doesn't handle my clothes though. This is an often overlooked vector.
 
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My old chocolate lab was on prednisone for arthritis 10mg a day for about a year and 1/2 before he passed , in the mean time I had a bad angle sprain and the VA doc prescribed me a dose of the same thing and it worked great, so when my lab passed I just kept refilling the scrip for him for several months and now have a stash for emergencies. Something to think about.
 
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Prednisone in 5 mg tabs. A course for a moderate to almost severe allergic reaction (wide spread poison oak, for example), will start at 20 mg per day (either spaced 5 mg at a time through the day, or 4 tabs at once), daily for two or three days, then taper two days at a time, one less pill each level, until stopped. A bottle of 100 is easily obtained in Mexico (I travel to Progresso, MX), dirt cheap. I bring home 4-5 bottles.
Or the online docs can ship it to you. Handy damn drug.
I limit Quinolones, due to a possibility of Tendon Rupture, after taking them (Levaquin or Cipro), although they are super antibiotics inthe right application.
Flagyl is absolutely on the list. Takes care of a large number of parasites. Beaver Fever from drinking contaminated water (human or animal habitation upstream)
Cory's list above is actually pretty thorough, and simply needs an actual period of study as to when and how to use the items.
for instance: Benadryl: I have it in creme, injectable, and chewable tabs as well as caps/tabs.
Valium: Injectable: makes it FAR easier to reset a dislocated shoulder. Stops seizures.
I carried 20 syrettes of morphine in Vietnam, and only used it on severe extremity injuries. You can't use it in head injuries and only judiciously in a chest injury, yet it is far more adaptable than Demerol, which just seems to make people nauseated.
Doxycycline is OK, especially for Lyme, but never give it in any does to children under 7, as it stains permanent teeth. maybe that won't matter after the Zombie Apocalypse.
Bactrim is a drug which mixes Sulfa and another chemical Trimethoprim, which has no antibacterial effect), which enhances sulfa's efficacy. A lot of people are allergic to it (Sulfa). Used for UTI's but frankly an old standard of treating UTI in women is Macrodantin (nitrofurantoin) which not only is rarely allergenic, bacteria rarely are resistant. For instance some women have a bottle at home all the time. If they get a UTI every time they have sex with the randy beast of the house, The Doc tells them, simply pee immediately after, and pop a single Macrodantin before going to bed.
NSAID's: Very useful, but you don't need very many: Ibuprofen is effective pain relief, and if taken for a long enough period (2-3 weeks), also reduces inflammation from most injuries. An advantage, is that is can be taken with Tylenol at the same time, which has pain relief properties but no anti-inflammation effect. Both reduce fever.
The point is, when you are doing techniques, like bandaging or treating injuries, that is one thing, but when you start asking for lists of Meds, you enter a completely different school of thought. The nuances are many, and rife with pitfalls. You can't UN-give a medicine, you can only fight the bad reaction.
All meds are to be used judiciously, and with deep study.
 
<snip>

The point is, when you are doing techniques, like bandaging or treating injuries, that is one thing, but when you start asking for lists of Meds, you enter a completely different school of thought. The nuances are many, and rife with pitfalls. You can't UN-give a medicine, you can only fight the bad reaction.
All meds are to be used judiciously, and with deep study.
No worries. I am ultra-conservative with pharmaceuticals, ironically as a result of being borne by a Pharm D. We used to joke that you had to show up with your head under your arm to get meds from our mom. Dodging the bullet of Thalidomide was probably a big reason for her to be so tight-fisted with the pharma candies. Her OBGYN had prescribed it during the pregnancy with me and she never bothered to take it and rather dealt with the inconveniences of nausea and vomiting. Thanks mom -now in heaven- for me not having to type with my feet.

Growing up around a retail and compounding pharmacy (Apotheke in German) I quickly understood the issues of individual drug tolerance, contra-indications and drug interactions. Back then, the pharmacist played a much bigger role in the treatment and was regarded by the medical doctors as a colleague, delving deeper into the chemical complexities.

If not so lazy, I would have studied medicine/pharmacology. But you needed a straight A high school diploma to be admitted to the tuition-free German medical schools (aka numerus clausus). So I studied engineering where they took anyone crazy enough to start and then whittled the field down from 1000 in the first semester to 100 at graduation.

Anyways, I still find biology, medicine, and pharmacology very interesting, actually read and understand every word of the accompanying drug information and have close relationships with several MDs to discuss the salient details. Unfortunately, none of my MD friends has enough outdoor or combat experience to suggest a tight, relevant list. That's where you guys come in. I see the list of crucial meds as a starting point for further research and discussion with the medical experts.

Thanks for the valuable suggestions so far.
 
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@johnnycat
And
@UKDslayer
@Doc68
Are the only medical professionals that I know on this board, I would trust.
Only thing maggot knows is how to treat a saw cut from sawmillin.
1) Sorry that I did not make this list.
2) The FDA does not allow Schedule II medications to have refills.
3) Look into EMLA for topical pain (it is a local anesthetic cream).
 
YEP
 

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Lots of talk about Antibiotics...They wipe out all of your good bacteria as well. You need to replace it or you will be in big trouble. Probiotics, foods like sauerkraut, yogurt, etc or probiotic pills like culturelle and others.


Ivermectin
 
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1) Sorry that I did not make this list.
2) The FDA does not allow Schedule II medications to have refills.
3) Look into EMLA for topical pain (it is a local anesthetic cream).
1) Please do not feel excluded by the armorpl8chikn filter. He just wanted to blow out some of the chaff, not knowing how much wheat SH has to offer. I remember you making well informed comments/suggestions on other medical threads.

2) I am not going to mess with Sched II stuff since I am blessed with a good pain tolerance and a high sensitivity to pain blockers. Sched IV Tramadol is moderate overkill for me right now. Granted, I have not experienced terminal cancer or a completely effed up spine but have cracked enough structural stuff over the decades to know my damage tolerance. I got the Tramadol script for the recovery from a laparoscopic hernia repair after refusing to take the script for OxyContin. I asked the PA semi-jokingly whether she is on drugs rolling out the big guns for one 10mm and two 5mm holes is my belly skin. In the end, I did not even take Tylenol after the operation. The whole concern about pain management has gotten out of control IMO. Pain is not just weakness leaving the body according to the Leathernecks but also a good indicator of what move you may not want to repeat.

3) I found some burn cream with 0.5% Lidocaine HCL (plus 0.13% BAC) in my first aid kit and that helped greatly to find sleep with the incessant itching. EMLA with 10 times the amount of Lidocaine/Prilocaine should be more than sufficient for my needs.
 
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Take some classes, get some training. All the meds/advice in the world will do you no good without some level of training. For a field med kit, I'm seeing lots of good advice. Some docs will prescribe short courses of antibiotics and other meds if you have a good long standing relationship. I'm currently in pain management, prescribed I/R oxy in a high dose. I use THC as an adjunct. Schedule 2 meds are prescribed 30 days at a time ie 1 tab every 8 hours equals 90 tabs a month. The VA used to do mine, and I would get 90 day supply by mail for anything written.
 
I’m a pharmacist in Aus. Slightly different rules here but I’ve found for the family med kits the most used items have been any of the cortisone creams for itch and inflamed skin (also in combination with an anti fungal - terbinafine is a far better option than miconazole or clotrimazole), mupirocin cream or chloramphenicol ointment for cuts/abrasions, and just a simple cream or gel with menthol for insect bites. Used in conjunction with an antihistamine sorts most inflammatory issues out.

We only run azithro, cefalexin and amoxil/clav as our antibiotics on hand.

Here you can get large tubes of triamcinolone prescribed. It’s moderately potent but comes in 100g tubes instead of the little 15-30g tubes of everything else. Great to have on hand and there’s plenty if needed for larger rashes.
 
A lot of this depends on who you want the kit for - you or for just a general group of people? Many people have drug allergies. If it is just for you or your immediate family you can really taylor your kit. If for gen pop then you have to broaden quite a bit

I'd say most of this has been covered already, but a few things that would be helpful (there is probably a "store-brand" generic for each of these:

Diarrhea - loperamide (Immodium) - l like the liquid form better as far as effectiveness though tablets would be easier to store and carry.

Constipation - Miralax powder. Do not overlook this - many of those SHTF foods are low in fiber so you need something to help you make

Allergy (nasal) - Flonase (fluticasone) nasal spray; tablets - Claritin, Zyrtec, Allegra. Dont underestimate good ole bulb syringe and salt water

Pain - Tylenol (Acetaminophen) for pain/headache an Advil (Ibuprofen), Aleve (Naproxen) for inflammation. If you can get a prescription then Mobic (Meloxicam) as it is longer acting

Upset stomach - Pepto bismol is actually pretty useful. Again, liquid is probably more effective but tablets easier to store and carry

Heartburn - Pepcid if you want something every now and then, Zegerid if you need something daily. Prilosec, Nexium, Prevacid are in the same family and good too but Zegerid is generally the best

Hemorrhoids - (if you dont have them you will with the constipation from that low fiber SHTF food) - Prep H or anything with Witch Hazel. Hydrocortisone cream pretty nifty here too,

Skin stuff - hydrocortisone cream

Cuts, scrapes, etc - triple antibiotic cream like Neosporin if you are not allergic to ; I generally just get Polysporin (double antibiotic cream) as virtually no one has an allergy to it and it is plenty effective. Than bandages to cover the wound.

Antibiotics are a good idea but that gets really complicated. I generally just stick to the basics -

Augmentin if not penicillin allergic for various stuff but pretty useful
Keflex for skin stuff (reportedly 25% of people with penicillin allergy cross react wit this class too)
Cipro for intestinal stuff
Flagyl for intestinal stuff (and parasites) - the combination of Cipro and Flagyl covers just about any infectious diarrhea.
Doxycycline for various stuff
Bactrim DS if not sulfa allergy for urinary tract infections (and others)
Azithromycin for respiratory stuff
Fluconazole for fungal/yeast infections
Ivermectin - parasites and viruses

This is a good start and all I can think of off the top of my head
 
Thanks everyone for the very valuable suggestions and contributions. There is a high concentration of fine gold in this thread.
I'll respond to individual questions and comments later when I have more time.

Also kudos to the usual bearpit suspects for not reducing the signal to noise ratio by waging their "your [sic] a fag/fed" wars in this thread.
 
Since I am not longer practicing; I can add some quackery again not to be perceived as medical advice.
Cory's list is good.
Coilloidal silver - IN MODERATION, esp. topically for wounds with manuka honey! If you take more too orally much it can cause argyria (skin turns blue-gray = bad) and can caues fatal heart arrythmias. I have a very weak immune system, so when I couldn't get antibiotics or aren't sure whether bacterial or viral - a dropper of colloidal silver along with C,D and zinc was/is still ago-to for me when I first start to get sick. Not for daily use.
Colloidal-silver w/manuka honey is my favorite wound treatment, and keep covered. Silvadene cream can be used for burns too. A bath with a cup of bleach in 40 gallon tub of water can help with excema; just moisturize after.
Cuts, scrapes, etc - triple antibiotic cream like Neosporin if you are not allergic to ; I generally just get Polysporin (double antibiotic cream) as virtually no one has an allergy to it and it is plenty effective. Than bandages to cover the wound.NO to Neosporin. Too many people are allergic to it; colloidal silver much better. If you must have a topical antibiotive, mupirocin.

No to neosporin - too many people allergic. Mupirocin OK, but it I had to pick one - it would be colloidal silver w/manuka honey.
Any antibiotic can been be over-used/abused ; but in a clench...Clindamycin for dental abscesses, aspiration pneumonias, gram-negative infections and serious GI stuff - but even in normal prescription doses it's so strong it can wipe out all healthy gut bacteria and cause fatal C.difficile infection so must be taken with probiotics (unless you like eating other peoples' poo!). Metronidazole (Flagyl) as above; these two for useful for pooches as wel as is Augmetin. Probiotics are always a good idea when taking antibiotics.
Zithromax can be useful for sinus stuff and may be an easier find .
Cipro for anthrax, but the tendon/joint issues are no joke and can cipro have life-threatening drug interactions;
Doxycycline and Bactrim DS => multipurpose. Doxy for sulfa allergic, and as Bactrim can produce rare but fatal allergic reaction (Stevens-Johnson); Doxy can treat skin inections, some UTI's, Lyme, but can yellow teeth under age 8 and not for use in pregnancy. Some potential use for malaria too though. Bactrim, like amox-with sub clavulinic acid (Augmentin) is great for mixed infections wth gram positive and gram-positive organisms.
Saline for eye wash and topical ointment.
Again, most antibiotics/anti-infectives covered above buy Cory. Knowig what to use and when is the issue - hard cover survival guide/Ranger book useful.
One of our biggest upcoming issues is going to be Muti-drug resisitant TB.
Liquid tylenol, for all age groups
CBD, even if hemp based should be added here, esp. when pain meds un-obtainable.
Prednisone is a must have, don't take on empty stomach, GI stuff as above (i.e.fluocinolide). Be well versed in side effects though. Melatonin, oral benadryl.
Fluconazole is good for run of the mill fungal infections, but the serious stuff appearing is pretty much resistant to it.
Instead of HC cream, a stronger topical steroid (i.e. fluocinolide) is preferable. Please throw away Neosporin junk though.
Don't overlook the used of supplements, including multivitamins and esp.Vitamin D, in times of food shortages and probiotics.
For GI, besides the basics like loperamide, mylanta/ MOM, Its not a bad idea idea to ge ahold of zofran (odandestron) and pedialyte.
SSKI (for radiation sickness), activated charcoal for many things, pedialyte and IV saline or lactated ringers if you cn get it and know how to use it.
 
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A varied regimen of antibiotics would be a good start. Personally, I'd add in a good stash of pain meds.

Good fucking luck getting any on those, especially the pain stuff. The medico's like to maintain tight control so they can insist on a paid visit. They use the excuse that they expire in a while. I'd rather have some expired ones than none at all. Or they could write a script that was refillable. Nope we want a paid visit.

Army found out after a 50yr study leaving all meds in desert not controlled as far as climate and penicillin only lost about 12% of effectiveness over that timeframe of all the drugs they tested.

Doc


"Most of what is known about drug expiration dates comes from a study conducted by the Food and Drug Administration at the request of the military. With a large and expensive stockpile of drugs, the military faced tossing out and replacing its drugs every few years. What they found from the study is 90% of more than 100 drugs, both prescription and over-the-counter, were perfectly good to use even 15 years after the expiration date."

After reading this I don't throw any meds away. I was fortunate enough to pick up a large first aid cabinet from work that was going into the trash, and every time Cintas comes to restock the expired meds I make sure to take them home with me. You can buy any prescription meds over seas and have them shipped.
 
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A lot of this depends on who you want the kit for - you or for just a general group of people? Many people have drug allergies. If it is just for you or your immediate family you can really taylor your kit. If for gen pop then you have to broaden quite a bit

I'd say most of this has been covered already, but a few things that would be helpful (there is probably a "store-brand" generic for each of these:

Diarrhea - loperamide (Immodium) - l like the liquid form better as far as effectiveness though tablets would be easier to store and carry.

Constipation - Miralax powder. Do not overlook this - many of those SHTF foods are low in fiber so you need something to help you make

Allergy (nasal) - Flonase (fluticasone) nasal spray; tablets - Claritin, Zyrtec, Allegra. Dont underestimate good ole bulb syringe and salt water

Pain - Tylenol (Acetaminophen) for pain/headache an Advil (Ibuprofen), Aleve (Naproxen) for inflammation. If you can get a prescription then Mobic (Meloxicam) as it is longer acting

Upset stomach - Pepto bismol is actually pretty useful. Again, liquid is probably more effective but tablets easier to store and carry

Heartburn - Pepcid if you want something every now and then, Zegerid if you need something daily. Prilosec, Nexium, Prevacid are in the same family and good too but Zegerid is generally the best

Hemorrhoids - (if you dont have them you will with the constipation from that low fiber SHTF food) - Prep H or anything with Witch Hazel. Hydrocortisone cream pretty nifty here too,

Skin stuff - hydrocortisone cream

Cuts, scrapes, etc - triple antibiotic cream like Neosporin if you are not allergic to ; I generally just get Polysporin (double antibiotic cream) as virtually no one has an allergy to it and it is plenty effective. Than bandages to cover the wound.

Antibiotics are a good idea but that gets really complicated. I generally just stick to the basics -

Augmentin if not penicillin allergic for various stuff but pretty useful
Keflex for skin stuff (reportedly 25% of people with penicillin allergy cross react wit this class too)
Cipro for intestinal stuff
Flagyl for intestinal stuff (and parasites) - the combination of Cipro and Flagyl covers just about any infectious diarrhea.
Doxycycline for various stuff
Bactrim DS if not sulfa allergy for urinary tract infections (and others)
Azithromycin for respiratory stuff
Fluconazole for fungal/yeast infections
Ivermectin - parasites and viruses

This is a good start and all I can think of off the top of my head
A warning about Aleve and others like it). READ THE SMALL PRINT. This shit can kill you.

Never take it on an empty stomach...even then, watch your stool and if it get black stop the Aleve immediately. It will burn holes in the lining of your stomach and can cause hemorrhaging. If you've reached that stage youre in trouble and might try a mild diet and omeprazole to stop the production of stomach acids so the lining can heal. Ask me how I know.
 
A warning about Aleve and others like it). READ THE SMALL PRINT. This shit can kill you.

Never take it on an empty stomach...even then, watch your stool and if it get black stop the Aleve immediately. It will burn holes in the lining of your stomach and can cause hemorrhaging. If you've reached that stage youre in trouble and might try a mild diet and omeprazole to stop the production of stomach acids so the lining can heal. Ask me how I know.
Since Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently consumed pharma products, let's dive a little deeper into the issues.

Here is an FDA published list of Non-selective NSAIDs
Chemical NameBrand Name
DiclofenacCataflam, Voltaren, Arthrotec (combination with misoprostol)
DiflunisalDolobid
EtodolacLodine, Lodine XL
FenoprofenNalfon, Nalfon 200
FlurbiprofenAnsaid
Ibuprofen**Motrin, Motrin IB, Motrin Migraine Pain, Advil, Advil Migraine Liqui-gels, Ibu-Tab 200, Medipren, Cap-Profen, Tab-Profen, Profen, Ibuprohm, Children's Elixsure *, Vicoprofen (combination with hydrocodone), Combunox (combination with oxycodone)
IndomethacinIndocin, Indocin SR, Indo-Lemmon, Indomethegan
Ketoprofen**Oruvail, Orudis, Actron
KetorolacToradol
Mefenamic AcidPonstel
MeloxicamMobic
NabumetoneRelafen
Naproxen**Aleve, Naprosyn, Anaprox, Anaprox DS, EC-Naproxyn, Naprelan, Naprapac (copackaged with lansoprazole)
OxaprozinDaypro
PiroxicamFeldene
SulindacClinoril
TolmetinTolectin, Tolectin DS, Tolectin 600

"Non-selective" means that these drugs inhibit both the COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme. The inhibition of COX-2 reduces inflammatory responses, which is the goal. But unfortunately, the simultaneously inhibited COX-1 is a necessary component for the stomach lining's ability to protect against the corrosive stomach acid. Simplistically speaking, the stomach is made from the same material (meat) that you are going to dissolve in the course of digestion. That would not work too well without a functioning, protective lining. If the continuous rejuvenation of this protective lining is compromised by local COX-1 inhibition, then the acid will attack the underlying tissues and cause ulcers (local erosion pits) and bleeding. Therefore, it is crucial to avoid high concentrations of NSAIDs in the vicinity of the stomach lining. Anything that promotes an even distribution and a low overall concentration of the NSAID in the stomach will reduce this risk.

Good NSAID practices: Food in stomach, taking NSAID with fluid, keep eating, staying up and mobile for several hours after intake

Bad NSAID practices: Intake on empty stomach, resting or worse going to bed after NSAID intake, eating/drinking foods known to increase acidity in stomach

Aware of this side effect, the pharma industry searched and found COX-2 selective compounds that would not mess with the stomach lining integrity via COX-1 inhibition. This led to the class of

COX-2 Selective NSAIDs
Chemical NameBrand Name
CelecoxibCelebrex
ValdecoxibBextra
RofecoxibVioxx

Boomers who have NSAIDs on their daily diet for Osteoarthritis or Rheumatoid Arthritis may remember the third one on the list. Vioxx, a multi-billion revenue earner was pulled off the market after a post-approval trial performed by the manufacturer Merck showed an unacceptable mortality rate due to cardiovascular events after prolonged intake. (It may be worth noting that the frequency of the terminal side effects was in the same order of magnitude than those of the clot shot which is still being peddled today.)

There is now substantial evidence that COX-2 selective NSAIDs trade lesser risk of gastrointestinal side effects for more cardiovascular risk and the hunt for the OA/RA miracle drug is still on.

From my own experience, I would place Vioxx in the league of wonder drugs for resolving acute(!) inflammation of joints and tendons. It was prescribed to me after an Achilles tendonitis caused by waterskiing resisted all treatment attempts short of steroid injection. The challenge with Achilles tendonitis is that conservative treatment through immobilization is practically infeasible for an active person and prolonged irritation/inflammation increases the risk of tendon rupture, a very undesirable and costly outcome. Local steroid injection will stop the inflammation but at the price of potential weakening and increased rupture risk. Vioxx resolved the symptoms within a day or two and a week or so later I was back on the water in a different binding to avoid reoccurrence.

Arcoxia, sold in Europe, appeared to be a close analogue and I will give Celebrex, the only COX-2 selective NSAID still available in the USA, a try the next time I traumatize something mechanical. But no drug on this list appears to be a prudent choice for prolonged daily use in the eyes of this medical layman. I would also not gobble down like candy the OTC items on the first list just because they are available everywhere.

Ask your doctor for what's best in your particular situation.
 
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Back when we first started doing a TacMed class, you could often get your Dr. to write scrips and or provide samples of nice to have meds, not so much anymore. This place will setup kits for most purposes, though I still advise you consult your own family doctor to confirm what's right for you in the kit.
JASE Med Kits

This was my original list of meds for the DFAK. The Sched II stuff is pretty much unobtanium nowadays, OTC meds like Naproxsen will do in most cases. I still advise getting some Narcan for potential OD's even you you don't stock your own opioids. Locals are great for lots of stuff as well, if you can learn to apply a nerve block Marcaine will deal with some pretty severe pain for quite some time and is reasonably safe for a non-professional HCP. Antibiotics are nice to have, though one does need to understand how they work and what dosage is used for which suspected infection. The SOF Medical Handbook, Where There is No Doctor, Ditch Medicine and the old SF Medical Handbook will help you out there. This misc section has some handy stuff, like Zofran for nausea, epi/benedryl for allergic reactions, and IV fluids should be on hand for some antibiotic uses and general fluid replacement.

Definitely consult your Dr. on the antibiotics, allergic reactions and drug interactions can be fatal. This list is normally pretty universal, but I have no idea if your personal history supports the use of all of these.

Pain Meds - Schedule II Narcotics
Demerol (Meperidine)
Morphine
Valium (Diazepam)

Reversal agent for narcotic overdose
Narcan (Naloxone)

Local Anesthetics
Lidocaine
Marcaine

Antibiotics
Amoxicillin
Azithromycin
Ceftriaxone
Keflex (Cephalexin)
Cipro (Ciprofloxacin)
Levaquin (Levofloxacin)
Bactrim (Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim)
Flagyl (Metronidazole)
Erythromycin ointment

Misc
Prednisone
Epinephrine 1:10000
Benadryl (Diphenhydramine)
Zofran (Ondanestron)
Loperimide
Normal Saline, D5W (Dextrose 5% in Water) and Ringers Lactate IV bags
You can find almost all these meds here at

Internationaldrugmart.com

That's where I get my prepper shit. Several orders now. A little here, little there adds up to a good pharmacy over time.
 
There's a good amount of valuable information here in this thread, and some others that are/were like it in the past.

As has also been brought up, are we talking about a 'personal' kit, a 'family and friends' kit, or a "Mass Casualty Event" where a LOT of people are going to need a LOT of stuff, and there's bound to be a/some medically trained individuals who simply need 'stuff'.

So everyone is carrying the daily aspirin as well as the defibrillator as well as the extra-long needle for lumbar punctures to be performed. Because you know, they do it on all the tv episodes.

What is a good start?
What is overkill?
What is 'insane level madness'?
 
I tried an improvised eyepatch but the healthy eye was still watering like crazy adding to the already severe acuity degradation from loosing distant vision. And lets not forget the distraction from the pain, which was substantially more annoying than the worst tooth ache I ever experienced. A prescription eyedrop formulation containing an antibiotic and corticosteroid resolved the debilitating symptoms in less than an hour. It took a few more days before I could put the contact lens back in the left eye but the pharmaceutical intervention got me quickly "back in the fight".
Not really on topic for meds, but
You wear one contact normally and one eye tuned up for close vision.
I would shop for cheap corrected eyeglasses to keep in your Go-bag, might need two.
Something that would replace the contact, and one to increase focus length for the short eye.
Anyone with movement limiting eye issues should plan for the Stick-In-The Eye.
Carry a back up :)
 
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