Maggie’s THE "NOM NOM NOM" THREAD

Snuby642

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  • Feb 11, 2017
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    Slow cooked pork chops.
    About ten minutes total worth of work and an hour cooking low and slow.

    Chops, seasoned to your liking, seared on one side quickly then turned and seared. Toss in a sliced onion some garlic.



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    Sweat down the onion some and mix around in pan drippings. Turn the pan down to low. Ad 2 cans of cream of mushroom soup not diluted on top.

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    Cover and Walk away.



    Serve with rice or potatoes.

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    Easy eats and in case the wife is sick you can load the dishwasher, sweep the floor, feed the dogs and still drink a beer while it cooks.

    If you're careful managing the heat the pan will rinse clean no scrubbing.

    The important part is to remember the dogs get fed and the dishes get washed, got it?

    Cost me some range time but a sick wife and grandchild took precedent, kid took first steps in my house today.
     
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    Snuby642

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    Bean water:

    Nards, gristle, fat and bone.

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    Don't that look good?

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    Well that's done.
     
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    Snuby642

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    So ok looking and tasting better now.

    Full disclosure I put too much pecan sticks in the smoker and got a bit much smoke on the ham.

    Not a problem, trim rind off.
    My bean water was over smoked so I cut it with chicken broth.

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    Problem solved.
     

    Snuby642

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    Very few ingredients.
    You don't have to use smoked ham.

    Ham hocks / smoked necks and any smoked sausage will be good.

    Soak beans overnight, drain .
    Use chicken stock instead of water and add leftover smoked items if available and make "bean water "
    Stain out all the junk and bring beans to a boil then simmer for a long time.

    I like onions, garlic, seasonings and butter in mine. Put your good meat in after you boiled the beans and have turned them down to a simmer.

    Don't boil meat.

    Cook slow and stir when you can.

    When done slow and with a purpose it's good eats.
     
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    tomcatmv

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    That's one of the reasons you always buy a bone-in ham. Not only do they have much more flavor than a boneless ham, you get the added bonus meal of a great pot of bean soup. I usually use navy or great northern beans and like to add some chopped carrots, a can of diced maters and a bit of celery and onion.
    Though some might flame me, I also through in about a 1/3 cup of Heinz ketchup, oh and lots of cracked ground pepper to taste.
    Serve with a good crusty sourdough bread.
    Damn, I'll be making this the weekend after Thanksgiving with the leftover ham bone:)
    BTW, hopefully y'all have a good Thanksgiving with friends and family!
    And may God bless America and God bless Texas.
     

    hangunnr

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    How about some venison “bacon”?
    While there isn’t a red blooded American that would ever confuse this with real bacon it is pretty good.
    Started out with 6# of lean venison and 2# of pork shoulder. You could use pure pork fat but I wasn’t really interested in having that much fat. Ran it all thru the 1/8” plate on the grinder which gives a very smooth texture. Seasoned with LEM products venison bacon seasoning mix.
    Set the smoker to 200 and gave it 2 hours of hickory smoke then let it go to an internal temp of 160. Once it comes off the smoker I let it cool then wrapped it up and refrigerated for 24 hours before cutting.

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    Cowpokey

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    How about some venison “bacon”?
    While there isn’t a red blooded American that would ever confuse this with real bacon it is pretty good.
    Started out with 6# of lean venison and 2# of pork shoulder. You could use pure pork fat but I wasn’t really interested in having that much fat. Ran it all thru the 1/8” plate on the grinder which gives a very smooth texture. Seasoned with LEM products venison bacon seasoning mix.
    Set the smoker to 200 and gave it 2 hours of hickory smoke then let it go to an internal temp of 160. Once it comes off the smoker I let it cool then wrapped it up and refrigerated for 24 hours before cutting.

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    Looks more like smoked sausage, with out the casing. Also looks delicious! Well done!
     

    sled_mack

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    How about some venison “bacon”?
    While there isn’t a red blooded American that would ever confuse this with real bacon it is pretty good.
    Started out with 6# of lean venison and 2# of pork shoulder. You could use pure pork fat but I wasn’t really interested in having that much fat. Ran it all thru the 1/8” plate on the grinder which gives a very smooth texture. Seasoned with LEM products venison bacon seasoning mix.
    Set the smoker to 200 and gave it 2 hours of hickory smoke then let it go to an internal temp of 160. Once it comes off the smoker I let it cool then wrapped it up and refrigerated for 24 hours before cutting.

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    Wow! I’m going to have to try that. Maybe a small dose of maple syrup too.
     
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    oneshot86

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    How about some venison “bacon”?
    While there isn’t a red blooded American that would ever confuse this with real bacon it is pretty good.
    Started out with 6# of lean venison and 2# of pork shoulder. You could use pure pork fat but I wasn’t really interested in having that much fat. Ran it all thru the 1/8” plate on the grinder which gives a very smooth texture. Seasoned with LEM products venison bacon seasoning mix.
    Set the smoker to 200 and gave it 2 hours of hickory smoke then let it go to an internal temp of 160. Once it comes off the smoker I let it cool then wrapped it up and refrigerated for 24 hours before cutting.

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    Damn, great job
     

    hangunnr

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    Been wanting to try my hand at sausage making so I gave it a shot…..
    Started with 7.5# lean venison and mixed it with 7.5# of pork shoulder. Used a seasoning mix from LEM products, added 2 heaping table spoons of garlic powder and the same quantity of course ground black pepper. Turned out fantastic. The only thing I ‘d do different next time is to add some citric acid to give it just a little bite….

    Into the smoker…
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    All done after 2 hours of smoke then an additional 4 hours to get to an internal of 160.
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    Snuby642

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    What casing did you use ?

    And is that an electric smoker ?

    Making sausage on a standard horizontal stick burner is a pita.

    Very hard to keep the low temperatures needed, nearly impossible in the heat of a Texas summer.
     

    tomcatmv

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    Picked up a nice eye of round roast yesterday. Anyone have a good recipe? I'm thinking of smoking a bit then crock pot with some broth for gravy. Found one smoker recipe on the web that looks pretty good but looking for input. Want to do it for tomorrow for a new year dinner.
     

    Snuby642

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    Picked up a nice eye of round roast yesterday. Anyone have a good recipe? I'm thinking of smoking a bit then crock pot with some broth for gravy. Found one smoker recipe on the web that looks pretty good but looking for input. Want to do it for tomorrow for a new year dinner.
    I have tried similar in the past, epic fail.
    Smoked meats and gravy don't mix well IMHO.

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    I suggest something like this, traditional roast.
    Quick pan sear, seasoned and ready for the oven.
    The pan it was seared in was deglazed with beef broth and used for the gravy.
     
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    Ronws

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    New Year's Day, I slow-cooked a chicken with chopped small red potatoes and baby carrots, sliced onion, sliced mini sweet peppers, mushrooms, sometimes sliced garlic. Weber's Beer Can Chicken seasoning.

    Also, for New Year's Day, our good luck tradition of black-eyed peas with bits of the leftover spiral cut glazed ham that I had cooked for Christmas.
     

    Forgetful Coyote

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    NOTE: dont do this to a country ham.. country hams are usually masterpieces as-is. This is for fixing up a city ham


    A versatile recipe, you can customize to your liking.

    Dr. Chicken’s Double Smoked Ham - Link with text below
    http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...8&postcount=14

    Ham should be a fully cooked or partially cooked ½ shank variety or can be shoulder variety (water added can be used, as long as the water added does not exceed 23% water added product.) If it is pre-smoked with hickory, that seems to work out best. Patti/Jean or Cooks among the best, but other varieties can be used!

    Update: Use a full shank ham if you want. They work wonderful and they leave less good eatin' areas exposed to the heat to dry out. I've cooked up to a 26 lbs full shank ham. Absolutely one of the best too! An uncooked ham works well too. That way you don't have to limit yourself when choosing a ham.

    Glazing Sauce:

    ½ cup brown sugar
    ¼ cup maple syrup (use dark grade B real maple syrup if available)(dark grade B has more flavor than grade A)
    ¼ cup honey
    2 Tbsp cider vinegar
    1 – 2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
    2 Tbsp instant coffee granules (use a good brand because it makes a difference)
    1 Tbsp dry ground mustard
    2 Tbsp orange juice concentrate (a good brand provides better flavor)

    Blend all ingredients in a sauce pan with a wire whip and heat slightly until everything combines into a viscous or thick looking sauce.

    Cooking instructions for the oven:

    Score outer skin of ham to a depth of ½ inch in a crisscross diamond pattern. This will allow the glazing sauce to penetrate below the skin, into the actual ham. Place ham (un-glazed) into a shallow roasting pan or roasting rack. If pineapple and cherries are desired on the outside, add them when you start the glazing process. Cook in oven @ 275° - 300° with a loose tent of aluminum foil over the top for 25 to 30 minutes per lb. Baste with glazing sauce the last hour of cooking time and continue to cook until the ham reaches an internal temperature of 140°. Remove from oven and allow to sit covered for 20 to 30 minutes before carving!

    Cooking instructions for ceramic cooker cooking:

    This can be done on a grill over indirect heat or in a water smoker or other type of cooker, again over indirect heat or “low & slow” type cooking. Do not tent over ham if done on grill, water smoker or other cooker; this would prevent smoke from penetrating the ham.

    Place water soaked chunks of mesquite, hickory or pecan (we prefer the smoke of pecan over all the others) on coals 5 minutes before putting ham on cooker. This will allow the ham to obtain maximum smoke flavor during the second cook cycle. ( the first cook cycle is the cycle the processor uses.) If even more smoke flavor is desired, place ham in freezer for 1 to 1 ½ hours prior to cooking to allow outer edges of ham to start to freeze. Go easy on this procedure; you don’t want the ham frozen hard!

    If using a water smoker, fill water pan ¾ full with hot water and add 2 cups of orange, pineapple, or orange/pineapple mix, sweetened grapefruit or apple juice to the water. (all of them act as tenderizer as the steam penetrates the meat.) (I use a ¾ full drip pan when cooking on the Eggs, filled with a 50:50 mix of water and orange juice.)

    Again, cook for 25 to 30 minutes per lb. until internal temp on the ham shows 140°. A couple of books suggest 145° and 160° respectively. Shirley O. Corriher in her book “CookWise” suggests 140°. We found this to be exactly right. After removing from the Egg, it will climb up to 145° internally. The ham will retain it moistness and the flavor will go thru out the ham this way.

    Update: Pull the ham from the cooker at 135° internal. Even if it is an "uncooked" ham. Jim Minion and I have been playing around on this issue. Both of us feel 135° internal is enough to carry the ham up to 145° internal while you let it rest wrapped in foil for an hour or so. I wrap the ham in a double wrap of heavy duty foil. That seals the juices inside (relatively speaking!) and keeps the ham from starting to dry out during the resting period. The 135° internal tempperature suggestion is right in line with Shirley O. Corriher and her book "CookWise". This is one gal that has her act together! It is a great reference book for a lot of things. Start your cooking process at 225° on the dome thermometer of your ceramic cooker. Then let it gradually creep up to 250° to 260°. The 275° suggested temp. is a mit too high, in my opinion and after cooking 50 to 60 of these over the last 3 or 4 years.

    Baste ham with glazing sauce every 10 to 15 minutes during the last hour of cooking time. Glazing compound will burn, so do not start glazing the ham until the internal temp of the ham reaches 120°.

    NOTE: The secret to this process is plenty of smoke and the real maple syrup and granular coffee crystals in the glazing sauce. Use a cheaper cut of ham like mentioned before, and people will think you bought an expensive ham that you had to “hock” your kids for! Yuk! Yuk! (see my pun there?) The glazing sauce will give the ham a fantastic taste, smell and color!

    Update: Use the "Dr. Chicken's Sweet Kiss of Death" injectable marinade recipe to take the ham up 3 or 4 notches. I can't emphasize enough how much the injectable marinade adds to the finished product. You and your family will be in 7th heaven woofing it down. I'm including it in this e-mail.

    If you start glazing the ham at 120° internal, you'll only have to apply the glaze twice. Do this 30 minutes apart. That way you won't lose a lot of cooking time trying to apply it every 15 minutes. 2 applications of the glaze will do a wonderful job if you make sure you get it into the cut areas.

    NOTE: Don't use a spiral cut ham the first time out. They tend to dry out too easily! If you are forced to use one, use 1 & 1/2 X the "Sweet Kiss of Death" injectable marinade I suggest. That will prevent it from drying out during the cooking process. Also, be sure you keep your cooker down to that 260° as a maximum on the dome.

    Someone on another forum suggested removing all the skin before cooking. DON'T!!!!! That's the easiest way to ruin the ham by drying it out.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Dr. Chicken’s Sweet Kiss of Death Injectable Marinade

    First off, let me give a little background into the idea behind this injectable marinade and the reasoning behind it.

    Years ago, my Grandma and my Mom both cooked such delightfully good hams at Christmas time, it would make your head swim in delight. The aroma would make our house smell good for days!

    Tender, sweet, moist (most of the time) and just plain scrumptious, it was a memory like all of us have. I always wanted to duplicate the recipe. But, by the time I got around to asking my Mom about it, she was nearly bed ridden and had trouble remembering yesterday much less 40 to 50 years ago. Mom passed away 2 years ago last Valentines Day in 2000. But, I’ve continued to search and work at that memorable cooked ham.

    Five years ago, I took a challenge from my oldest brother to duplicate that recipe in an outdoor cooker. He said, “It can’t be done!” Any of you that have tried my “Dr. Chicken’s Double Smoked Ham” recipe knows that remark was not true then and is not true now!

    But, in all honesty, even the double smoked ham recipe left something to be desired. Sometimes it left the ham tasting great, but a little too dry. I believe it was Earl or Sprinter or GFW from the BGE user’s forum that suggested I use an injectable marinade in the ham, such as Cajun Injector’s or Tony Chachere’s Honey-Pecan-Praline marinades. Believe me, they both did a great job, but neither of them added the “punch” like I wanted. So, I have kept on trying.

    Well folks, I think I have come up with what I wanted. Either recipe is a winner, but using them both on the same ham will result in by far the most fantastic tasting ham you will ever try.

    Please give both recipes a try! You will love the results! I hope too, it will become a “family tradition” like my Mom’s and my Grandma’s was in our family.

    Ingredients:

    1 Cup of Good clean water (if your city or well water has an offensive taste, please use bottled water)

    1 Cup of light Karo syrup (make sure it is light Karo brand syrup)

    1/8 Cup of Amaretto liqueur (use the real stuff it makes a difference)

    2 Tbs of Watkins brand Butter Pecan extract (this is the only Butter-Pecan extract I could find) Note: I ran out of this twice in the past few months so I substituted "Blackburn's Butter Pecan" pancake syrup. Not a bad substitution. Double the amount shown here as Butter Pecan extract.

    1 Tbs of Rum extract (again, I used Watkins because of the better taste than store bought)

    1 tsp of Orange extract (this compliments the orange juice concen. used in the glaze or basting sauce)(cut this in half or use 1 Tbsp of orange juice concentrate....otherwise it may overpower the entire recipe.)

    1 to 2 TBS Vanilla extract (again, I used Watkins because of taste after the first run)



    Directions for blending:

    Into a medium size sauce pan add the water, Karo syrup and Amaretto. Stir frequently and heat very slowly to avoid scorching the sugars in the syrup.

    Then, add all the remaining ingredients and continue to stir and heat slowly. When the mix looks uniform in color and smooth, remove mix from the stove and allow it to cool to almost room temperature.

    Directions for use:

    Wrap ham in 2 layers of plastic wrap before starting the injection process.

    Using a marinade hypodermic syringe, inject at least 2 fluid ozs. Per pound of meat in a grid pattern through out the entire ham and don’t be afraid to use up to 3 ounces per pound of meat.

    Continue to inject the marinade into the ham until the entire amount of marinade is injected evenly into the ham.

    Cook the ham as shown in the “Double Smoked Ham” recipe. Be sure to you your favorite wood for smoke flavoring.

    Do not cook the ham beyond 140° internal to prevent over cooking and drying out the ham.
     

    Snuby642

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    Liers Chicken Parmigiana.

    So my wife made some of the most tender fried chicken cutlets.
    Split breasts fried to perfection.

    A couple of days earlier she made me Italian sausage pasta.

    There were leftovers from both.
    And she went to the shooting range without me.

    Big mistake.
    So liers chicken Parmigiana was born.
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    Red meat sauce and cheese, first layer.

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    Fried chicken and a mixture of cheeses next. More red sauce and cheese next, a parmesan blend, parmesan original shredded and mozzarella on top.

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    Lier lier chicken dinner!
     

    Snuby642

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    So where's the aldenta pasta and delicious garlic bread ?

    In Kato hell.
    Thanks for asking.
     
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    Snuby642

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    I'm 64, traveled the US and some of Europe, that was better than 95% + of what I ever had.

    A blend of dry cheeses, shredded parmesan and mozzarella and chicken breasts that were split and tenderized before fried.

    Wow, too many "Italian" restaurants suck at what they do. Lol