Fieldcraft This is how you do range math Check it out

Tyler Kemp

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Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

So...just add 10% for meters to yards, and vice versa. Easier for me.
 

Flynn

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Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: CoryT</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Could I just stick with + or - 10 percent? I'm math challenged.

300 meters + 10% = 330 yards

600 yards - 10% = 540 meters

Seems close enough for government work
wink.gif


</div></div>

I use this method.
 

Furtaker_.223

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Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Chappy76</div><div class="ubbcode-body">this should be a sticky</div></div>

+1 for a sticky
 

JWM0321

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Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

Good stuff. I'm a +/- 10 % fan myself.
 

Radar360

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Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

Good info! I'm glad this thread continues to be around.

Thanks for this post John.

And Cory - I also like the simplicity of the + or - 10% rule.

Awesome.
 

Tato

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Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

Thank you to share this "things"
smile.gif
 

Glock30

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Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: TiroFijo</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All I can say is life is tought for the US customary system users...
smile.gif


My system is like this:

measure objects AND range in meters (whoa! <span style="font-style: italic">same units for both</span>, and <span style="font-style: italic">decimal</span>, what a concept!)

<span style="color: #FFFF00">then: target size * 1000 / mil reading = range</span>

done

it is also nice that (since metric units are <span style="font-style: italic">decimal</span>) they correlate exactly with mils:

0.1 mil (aka 1 click) = 1 cm at 100 m
10 mils (aka as "head to crotch") = 1 m at 100 m </div></div>

New guy to distance shooting.

How do you determine target size?
AND
Does anyone use the "Mildot Master" ?
Mildot master
 

J.Boyette

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Glock30</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    New guy to distance shooting.

    How do you determine target size?
    AND
    Does anyone use the "Mildot Master" ?
    Mildot master </div></div>

    Sir, go to this link http://www.tracearmory.com/gear.html and you will see why the mil-Dot master is a key tool to own and use.

    John
     

    signut

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    Have seen this before, ran the numbers thru a calculator and numbers are so close to perfect it's scary . Now if I can remember where I left my rifle....
     

    aaron burks

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    Thats great! Thank you J.Boyette for posting that formula. As a new long distance shooter this site is unbelievable for the sheer volume of information available.
     

    ColoYooper

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    Funny, I was doing some range math myself and thought I had come up with a magic formula for my buddy and I to attempt some REALLY long range shots at antelope...but I see that someone on this thread has already mentioned it...kinda. Its the 27.77 magic number. BUT he should have mentioned that that ASSUMES you have your scope set to 25x power. Anyway we were attempting to avoid having to fork out the BIG bucks for the Geovid range finder. Here for you late night reading is my analysis.
    Initially I derived a REALLY cool equation that is easy to remember and is 98% accurate: Distance_In_Meters = Scope_Power * Target_Size_Inches / MILS_Spanned. I was ASSUMING that we could just zoom our 8.5x to 25x scopes until our target of known size spanned some easy to read MIL amount, read the scope power and accurately determine the distance. The problem was our Leupold Mark 4 target scopes, while truly 8.5 to 25x, didn't precisely have the mid ranges stamped on the scope tube. Also, I could obtain my best MILs span measurements at the 25x power anyway. So I modified my equation to ASSUME 25x and compute range in Yards as opposed to Meters (This is AMERICA after all). The modified equation is 100% accurate ASSUMING you can measure the MILs span perfectly! So this equation has a constant you need to remember: 27.78. The equation is: Distance_In_Yards = 27.78 * Target_Size_Inches / MILs_Spanned. Cool!!! and it was very accurate out to 500yards or so. So could my friend and I save the $2500 for the Geovid range finder?

    Let’s take an example: a 40” antelope is standing 1283 Yards away. A typical shot worthy antelope is 40" ground to shoulder.

    Solving the 100% equation above for MILS = 27.78 * 40 / 1283 we get 0.866 MILs

    No one will measure that!…Assume we measure 0.9 MILs at 25x on the scope.

    Plugging that into the equation to figure distance in Yards = 27.78 * 40 / 0.9 = 1234.6 Yards.

    Looking at the ballistics tables, the 300WM with 210gr bullet will have the following drops at yardages:

    o 1234 yards = -500 inches

    o 1283 yards = -550 inches

    So we would miss-predict the drop by 50 inches on a 40 inch antelope. (Clean miss !)

    So in the end, we will need to fork over the $2500 for the Geovid range finder, because with each yard of distance at 1200yards, the bullet drops and inch ( THIS IS WITH A 300WM ) or, we will need to continue to take "ethical shots" at a much closer distance...anyway. It would be cool to someday drop an antelope at over 1000yrds in one shot.

    Its only rocket surgery.
     

    Brian Moyer

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    Hey John it's been some time for me you always hit a home run with your ability to describe things on the computer. If you are a knucle dragger like me,I carry a sniper data book which makes things very simple and accurate with all of your necessary formulas and range conversion charts. I got mine from Iron Brigade Armory also a handy tool is a Mil-Dot Range Master. They're excellant tools.
     

    10ringping

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    You just made ranging with my Mil dot Valdada IOR way faster for me. Thanks!!!
     

    Kinjo

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    Another newbie, I enjoy learning the math involved. This thread has made me really understand it a lot more. Thanks everyone
     

    ColoYooper

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    I often like to approximate the Yards to Meters by first determining the feet in a meter as:

    feet = meters * 5 /( e root (pi))

    then just divide that number by 3 to get yards.
     

    1moa

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: TiroFijo</div><div class="ubbcode-body">My system is like this:

    measure objects AND range in meters (whoa! <span style="font-style: italic">same units for both</span>, and <span style="font-style: italic">decimal</span>, what a concept!)

    then: target size * 1000 / mil reading = range

    done

    it is also nice that (since metric units are <span style="font-style: italic">decimal</span>) they correlate exactly with mils:

    0.1 mil (aka 1 click) = 1 cm at 100 m
    10 mils (aka as "head to crotch") = 1 m at 100 m </div></div>

    I think that sniper's hide is the first shooting forum.
    I always read it but never write, for me is not simple write in english , I am italian and I studied English only at school, a very basic english, but work in decimal system is part of my life.
    Excuse me for write error.

    Usually in range mildot formula in decimal sistem we use:

    dimension obj in meter * 1000 / nr mils on target = distance

    example: my target is hight 1,8 m and the mils dot cover it with 3 dot

    1,8 m * 1000 / 3 =
    1800 mm /3 = 600 meters

    In decimal sistem 1,8 meters are equals at 18 decimeters; 180 centimeters; 1800 millimeters,
    for this reason 1,8 m * 1000 is equal at 1800 millimeters

    In range mild dot formula is more easy if we use immediatly the hight target dimension in millimeters. It is very easy:

    1,6 meters = 1600 millimeters
    1,769 meters = 1769 millimiters
    0,54 meters = 540 millimeters

    easy

    So, when you use the mildot formula:

    hight target in millimiters / nr mils cover it = distance

    my obj is hight 1,56 meters = 1560 millimeters
    3 mildots cover it

    1560 / 3 = 520 meters

    one mathematics operations less.

    Like in quote: 10 mils (aka as "head to crotch") = 1 m at 100 m

    not exactly

    10 mils aren't 1 meter at 100 meters


    The correct:

    1 mil = 10 centimeters at 100 meters or 0,1 meters at 100 meters
    1 mil = 100 centimers at 1000 meters or 1 meter at 1000 meters (1 kilometers)
    0,1 mils (turret click)= 1 centimeters at 100 meters or 0,01 meters at 100 meters
    0,1 mils (turret click)= 10 centimeters at 1000 meters or 0,10 meters at 1000 meters


     

    L42a1

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    very very cool
     

    Snake-Eyes

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    dangedan87,

    Nice summary sheet, but that last line should read "1 MOA = 1.047..." not 1 MIL.
    Otherwise, looks good.
     

    dangerdan87

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    Re: This is how you do range math Check it out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: SnakeEyes</div><div class="ubbcode-body">dangedan87,

    Nice summary sheet, but that last line should read "1 MOA = 1.047..." not 1 MIL.
    Otherwise, looks good. </div></div>

    Yeah, I know. I got distracted with all the "MILS" haha
     

    TwoNiner

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    ...Or you could just +- 10% for yards to meters, meters to yards. Want to be more precise, do 9%. Of course, multiplying and dividing triple digit numbers by 9 isn't as easy as 10, so in the field when converting yards to meters and meters to yards I just use 10%.

    For milling I don't use any math at all because I built a simple chart which I keep in my databook. One column has all the mils (0-10) in 0.10 increments (the most accurate I can mil at the present) and the other column has the target heights: 6" to 6ft. Voila, no math needed.
     
    Last edited:

    sandwarrior

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    This is one of those gems needing a bump to the top.

    For me, converting meters to yards is +10%

    To convert yards to meters subtract 10% and add back 1%

    Example: 100 meters is as close as close gets to 110 yds. Think of high school track if you ran the yards system and now run meters

    If you subract 10% of 110 you come up with 11...add back 1% and you have 100 meters.

    100 yards minus 10% =90, add back one and you have 91. Close enough as 100 yds. =91.44 meters.
     

    Jrs9898

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    This is cool however I don't find myself needing to go from meters to yards or vice versa I range in yards and figure a firing solution for my target..
     

    sandwarrior

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    This is cool however I don't find myself needing to go from meters to yards or vice versa I range in yards and figure a firing solution for my target..
    And what happens when you don't have a laser rangefinder but are given a distance in meters? That's why we (try to) keep our brains sharp on math. ?
     

    bax

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    1 mil = 3.6 inches. There are several common versions, 3.6 is close enough.

    1 moa = 1.047 inches, 1 inch is close enough

    1 mil equals 3.43 moa; 3.4 is close enough

    1 moa = 0.29 mils; 0.3 is close enough. If you have a scope with MOA turrets and you need to go up a mil, three clicks up and hold over a bit. Half a mil is up two clicks and hold a bit under.

    1 mil at 1,000 yards is 36 inches; 1 mil round plate center to edge is 0.5 mils. With a left-to-right wind, you fire and miss a 1 mil plate just off the plate to the right, hold left edge (or dial half a mil) and reengage; expect center hit, call your shot. If windage is good but you hit just under, hold top edge (or dial half a mil) and reengage; expect center hit, call your shot.

    at 500 yards, an 18x24 steel silhouette is 1 mil (3.4 MOA) wide and 1.5 mils (5.1 MOA) high

    at 500 yards, a human head is 1/3 of a mil (1.1 MOA) wide and half a mil (1.7 MOA) high.

    If you are shooting a 308 at 1,000 yards with:
    • 4 MPH full value wind, hold 1.2 mils (4.1 MOA) into the wind.
    • 8 MPH full value, hold 2.4 mils (8.2 MOA).
    • 8 MPH wind from 1:30 o'clock, hold 1.7 mils (5.8 MOA).
    • 8 MPH at 1 o'clock, 1.2 mils (4.1 MOA).
    • If wind flags are 10 feet or more above the ground, assume bullet-level wind is between 1/4 and 1/2 of the flag value - check veg.
    You should be able to mentally calculate rough numbers between target size and turret clicks and reticle in your head. A scope with mil reticle and MOA turrets and target dimensions in inches is tough to do.
     

    JHOFF

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    Got your thinking cap on?

    If not go get it.

    This is how you do range math Check it out.

    There is 91.44 meters to every 100 yards. So if I wanted to do the math in my head its simple.

    I take the <span style="font-weight: bold">9</span> from the <span style="font-weight: bold">9</span>1.44 as a constant.

    I go <span style="font-weight: bold">2</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">2</span>00yds" x 9 = 18 move the last 0 in 10<span style="font-weight: bold">0</span> to the end of the 18 and get 180meters

    This is very close and will still get a hit on target. the difference between 90 and 91.44 is not much.

    Here are some more yards to meter range math:

    <span style="font-weight: bold">2</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">2</span>00yds" x 9 = 18 move the last 0 in 20<span style="font-weight: bold">0</span> to the end of 18 and get 180meters

    <span style="font-weight: bold">3</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">3</span>00yds" x 9 = 27 move the last 0 in 30<span style="font-weight: bold">0</span> to the end of 27 and get 270meters

    <span style="font-weight: bold">4</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">4</span>00yds" x 9 = 36 move the last 0 in 40<span style="font-weight: bold">0</span> to the end of 36 and get 360meters

    <span style="font-weight: bold">5</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">5</span>00yds" x 9 = 45 move the last 0 in 50<span style="font-weight: bold">0</span> to the end of 45 and get 450meters

    <span style="font-weight: bold">6</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">6</span>00yds" x 9 = 54 move the last 0 in 60<span style="font-weight: bold">0</span> to the end of 54 and get 540meters

    So on it goes

    going from meters to yards is the same game just a different direction.

    What you do is go with the same 9 from the <span style="font-weight: bold">9</span>1.44

    I take the <span style="font-weight: bold">2</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">2</span>00meters" x 9 = 18 drop the two 00 in 2<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 18 for 218yds

    Now lets look at the same distances just in meters

    <span style="font-weight: bold">3</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">3</span>00 meters" x 9 = 27 drop the two 00 in 3<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 27 for 327yds

    <span style="font-weight: bold">4</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">4</span>00 meters" x 9 = 36 drop the two 00 in 4<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 36 for 436yds



    <span style="font-weight: bold">6</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">6</span>00 meters" x 9 = 54 drop the two 00 in 6<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 54 for 654yds

    Granted you are off by 1 or 2 yards but it gets hits anyhow

    So on it goes

    Think I am nuts? Look here and do the conversion ---> <span style="font-weight: bold">LINK</span>

    type in 100 and pick your conversion.

    John
    i find this extremely confusing whats with <span style="font-weight: bold" >5</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">5</span>00 meters" x 9 = 45 drop the two 00 in 5<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 45 for 545yds <span style="font-weight>bold">5</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">5</span>00 meters" x 9 = 45 drop the two 00 in 5<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 45 for 545yds seeems like its in computer programmer code?
     

    sandwarrior

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    i find this extremely confusing whats with <span style="font-weight: bold" >5</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">5</span>00 meters" x 9 = 45 drop the two 00 in 5<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 45 for 545yds <span style="font-weight>bold">5</span> "<span style="font-weight: bold">5</span>00 meters" x 9 = 45 drop the two 00 in 5<span style="font-weight: bold">00</span> and insert the 45 for 545yds seeems like its in computer programmer code?
    Because the site has been through four iterations since the posting you refer to. Each time it changes, the code of the old stuff shows up.
     
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