Beef prices....

MarinePMI

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Like I said, I worked in a restaurant, so we had the band saws, grinders, stuffers, meat lugs, scales, knives and such for processing the bulk/primal cuts. While I understand a 1200 lb steer is a bit different to process from a size perspective, it still follows the same principle. Start with a whole animal, and work your way down to more manageable cuts until you get down to the individual portion cuts.

I'm thinking I should buy stock in LEM. :)
 
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supercorndogs

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The specifics for each animal are not hard to find. But a person does not really need to know any of it, to remove the meat from bones cut it into pieces and freeze. Its just some of that all to uncommon sense. If the entire thing is hitting the grinder, the only thing you need to know is to grind some fat with the lean cuts. Especially in a grass fed animal.
 

acudaowner

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now i just have to remove that immage from my mind or I'll be thinking about a bbq
 

lariat

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Do you have first hand knowledge or experience with animals "stuffed in a feedlot" or "walking around in knee deep shit"? I mean actually witnessed it first hand or had any experience in any animal ag at all? Are you familiar with dosage and withholding periods of antibiotics? Do you know the difference between gram positive and gram negative and the treatments?
If you look carefully at what Sixfive is laying down it's this: there isn't anyone in the supply chain that is looking to keep those animals in something other than the best condition, from rancher to salebarn to slaughterhouse to grocer. Losing one animal is a loss that the others have to cover. The occasional shitbirds that you call the Sherriff on may not fall into this category, but those in business know how to handle their assets. The USDA would shut down any salebarn or slaughterhouse that had that going on. For ranchers, these are their livelihoods and nobody is going to fuck around and not take care of them -look at Charger442's comments. We are all in that boat and that'sthe real scoop. the rancher is getting thin prices while the consumer is getting high prices. Its a bad deal.
 

Sixfivesavage

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its going to get really real here in about 4 months. if things arent back to somewhat normal with feedlots and packers buying their usual allotment, things are going to get really rough.

most everyone is grazing their cattle through the summer, ive got 20 steers and heifer calves that need to be sold at auction by September. for those that dont know, thats usually anywhere from $15k payday to $18k. there are a lot of people who are going to be in this same boat. if they cant go to auciton, im not sure what can be done.
Those of us with the feed and room will have a tremendous opportunity if it can be taken advantage of and the capital is available.
 

supercorndogs

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If you look carefully at what Sixfive is laying down it's this: there isn't anyone in the supply chain that is looking to keep those animals in something other than the best condition, from rancher to salebarn to slaughterhouse to grocer. Losing one animal is a loss that the others have to cover. The occasional shitbirds that you call the Sherriff on may not fall into this category, but those in business know how to handle their assets. The USDA would shut down any salebarn or slaughterhouse that had that going on. For ranchers, these are their livelihoods and nobody is going to fuck around and not take care of them -look at Charger442's comments. We are all in that boat and that'sthe real scoop. the rancher is getting thin prices while the consumer is getting high prices. Its a bad deal.
The debate is not around whether they are doing it knowingly or not. I am not arguing. His mind is as set. There is only one right way to skin a cat. Anyone who thinks different is a fool. Anyone who connects anything from agriculture to health problems is a raging MSN watching leftist, and some of them are. A democrat just sees something to scare people with. A republican just sees something else to put a tax on.

I dont worry about eating feed lot meat.
 

Charger442

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Those of us with the feed and room will have a tremendous opportunity if it can be taken advantage of and the capital is available.
thats going to be ok for a few individuals here and there, but what happens when feed prices shoot up as winter starts to close in? most of the cattle producing country in texas and the west are in a drought. theres usually a pretty good sell off by ranchers during heavy drought years, but what happens when there is no place to sell them? no buyers to buy them., etc.

then from a functional standpoint, i have a whole herd that is serviced by a bull. what happens when my heifers cycle on the first time and they are bred by my bull, because i cant sell them off before? going to have to try and cross-fence them out, but if those heifers are hot, theres not really a fence that will keep a bull out.
 

sea2summit

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being a hunter and processing a deer is much different than processing a 1200 lb butchered steer. the cuts are different and to do it properly a good band saw is called for.

i butcher and process my own 4h/FFA hogs and its not like butchering a deer. most people who "process" their own wild hogs dont know how to cut their own porkchops, etc.
I understand what your saying, people might not know their baby backs from their spares. But at the end of the day, I'm pretty sure most people who have butchered anything can take apart a cow or a hog. It may not be pretty but it's not hard to get all the edible portions off. Especially since it sounds like most of the people here are just making hamburger anyway...of course a grinder to handle that much burger is another matter.
 

Sixfivesavage

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thats going to be ok for a few individuals here and there, but what happens when feed prices shoot up as winter starts to close in? most of the cattle producing country in texas and the west are in a drought. theres usually a pretty good sell off by ranchers during heavy drought years, but what happens when there is no place to sell them? no buyers to buy them., etc.

then from a functional standpoint, i have a whole herd that is serviced by a bull. what happens when my heifers cycle on the first time and they are bred by my bull, because i cant sell them off before? going to have to try and cross-fence them out, but if those heifers are hot, theres not really a fence that will keep a bull out.
I understand and agree with you. I'm just making the point that if you're able to push things out for a time and can manage it with feed, facilities and finance, there's opportunity there for the producer with a sharp pencil and some out of the box thinking. Things are going to come back. The unknown is when. Why give them away now if you can hang onto them to get to a better opportunity.
 
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supercorndogs

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thats going to be ok for a few individuals here and there, but what happens when feed prices shoot up as winter starts to close in? most of the cattle producing country in texas and the west are in a drought. theres usually a pretty good sell off by ranchers during heavy drought years, but what happens when there is no place to sell them? no buyers to buy them., etc.

then from a functional standpoint, i have a whole herd that is serviced by a bull. what happens when my heifers cycle on the first time and they are bred by my bull, because i cant sell them off before? going to have to try and cross-fence them out, but if those heifers are hot, theres not really a fence that will keep a bull out.
Cows around here that were supposed to go to the feed lots are sitting on grass, that is already overgrazed. there has been no moisture this winter and nothing edible is really growing yet because it so dry. So double down, ruining more grass that wont recover this year, some of it never will as it becomes a dry washes, and having to feed extra mouths that should have been a paycheck already. This all illuminates the problems with loosing local production of things in most areas. Walmart and Safeway destroyed the local butcher shops that would be slaughtering these animals and selling them to the local market. Parts of SE Colorado are starting to look more like Arizona.
 
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Sixfivesavage

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The debate is not around whether they are doing it knowingly or not. I am not arguing. His mind is as set. There is only one right way to skin a cat. Anyone who thinks different is a fool. Anyone who connects anything from agriculture to health problems is a raging MSN watching leftist, and some of them are. A democrat just sees something to scare people with. A republican just sees something else to put a tax on.

I dont worry about eating feed lot meat.
Never did I say there was only one way to skin a cat or that anyone who thinks different is a fool. Me asking a simple question or two is not asking for an argument. Maybe you took it that way but I think it's fair to inquire about the source of your information and any personal experience or knowledge. There is a major amount of misinformation put out to discredit animal production specifically. Politics are bad on both sides, a prime example is the dairy industry. Both parties should stay the hell out of it, just like they should both stay the hell out of the majority of stuff in all of our lives. The truth is that the world, even just our country, can not feed itself without feedlots. I'm not sure who, where or what exactly you're claiming to be knee deep in shit or over crowded but I guarantee that would be the exception, not the rule. Same as with medication. If grass feed is your thing, so be it. I don't care. What I think makes a lot of those people fools is what they are willing to accept for a product with respect to what they pay. A lot of people claiming to grow and sell this stuff don't have the first idea of what they are doing and get away with charging what they charge due to the lack of knowledge of the customer.
 

supercorndogs

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I know you never said that. That is the attitude you are projecting. Most of those are common talking points not claims I made.

IMO

If those people think that meat is better for them because it hasn't been medicated, put in a feed lot, and fattened with grain, corn, and sugar it probably is. The placebo effect is quite strong all on its own. There is also the possibility they are right, and meat raised that way is better for us. If all beef had to be produced on grass, we wouldn't eat as much beef. You just have a differing opinion than theirs. Kind of like our opinions may differ on what would constitute a sanitary un-crowded feed lot. You say its great. I say its a necessary evil.

I think you are taking the knee deep is shit comment a little too literally also. As in every pin all the time is knee deep with shit, no. Yes, I have seen pins with areas, literally knee deep in shit. No, they are not all, always literally knee deep. Sometimes the manure spreaders that clean the pins don't show up, and pins go an extra cycle or two before cleaning. The cows are literally always slopping around in their own shit in the feed lots around here, its not always knee deep, and some feed lots are worse than others. I have been in at least a dozen on multiple occasions.
 

lariat

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OK, heres what I got as far as prices:

Beef on the hoof, 1,200-1400 lbs. That's a 720-840 hanging weight. $55 slaughter/disposal fee, $0.85/lb per hanging lb, $12 tenderizing. Just to be on the safe side of calculations I assume that I will get 40% of the animal in an edible form. Hanging weight incudes the bone that is still in there.
1,200 lbs = (720*.85)+55 = $667 processing fee. 1200*40% = 480 lbs of meat. Cost to me, all cuts: 1.39/lb

Don't get too excited. Its a 4 yr old all grass fed bull. Probably would get a little less for him than that at the salebarn so its an all-around deal. He isn't some Ruth's Chris specimen. But he will be pretty damn good, and we make money on the deal - we could sell him and then pay another 2X as much buying similar parts and nuggets back at the store. Not to mention the calves.

He was born here so I didn't buy him. That's where the big cost differential is. Use the processing prices, not the cost per pound as a guide.

I have had a reservation for this animals since December and its coming due on June 1.
 
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McNamara0851

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Clue me in please. What am I missing?
I finish steers on grain. I have them on creep feed as calves, and push them pretty hard in the feedlot, so it wouldn’t be unreasonable to have them at 1200# by 15 months. The rate of gain on grass fed, and finished calves will likely be much lower than grain fed calves. I would assume it would take 20-24 months to finish a steer on high quality pasture and hay. What I was saying is that you could have a 1200# grass finished calf, but it probably isn’t 15 months old. You can have a 15 month old grass fed calf, but it won’t likely be 1200#. Lastly you could have a 1200# 15 month old calf, but it likely wasn’t “grass finished” by definition. Sometimes individuals tell people what they want to hear. You got a fair deal on the beef either way, so as long as you’re happy with the quality, don’t read too far into it. Just be aware that you might not be getting exactly what you thought you paid for. I lost a townie customer this past year who had bought beef from us for years, by being honest when she asked if our beef was grass fed, organic, and antibiotic free. I was caught off guard. I explained to her the benefits of a vaccination program, disclosed the grain ration and the local mill that mixed it, offered to show her around the pastures , calving barn, and “feedlot” where her calves were born and raised, but she ultimately chose to buy beef from another local outfit that was willing to tell her what she wanted to hear. I would bet the farm that those boys haven’t raised a single grass finished, certified organic, antibiotic free, steer in their lives. She will never know the difference, so good for them I suppose. I don’t have anything to hide, and I take good care, and pride in our small operation, so I have no reason to tell a white lie, even if I know the next guy will profit from it.
 

Jscb1b

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Thank you. So to you the age vs weight vs feed is wrong. When I hear of grass fed, I think of the skinny rib showing range cows I've seen. I would like to see betsy(?) when it is delivered. One more question, would cow or bull make a difference?
 

Dta1

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Any of you guys ship? How much would it cost to ship a 1/4 beef to Southern california? These hipster farms are between 9.00 and 11.00 /# for this grass fed BS. Correct me if I’m wrong, but grass fed is way leaner? I want fat in my beef.
 

McNamara0851

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Any of you guys ship? How much would it cost to ship a 1/4 beef to Southern california? These hipster farms are between 9.00 and 11.00 /# for this grass fed BS. Correct me if I’m wrong, but grass fed is way leaner? I want fat in my beef.
I’ve never done it, but Omaha steaks does it every day. For the right money I’ll do about anything, so if you’re really interested I’d be willing to look into it.
 

Dta1

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I’ve never done it, but Omaha steaks does it every day. For the right money I’ll do about anything, so if you’re really interested I’d be willing to look into it.
I’ll pm you in the morning to discuss.
 

Sixfivesavage

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OK, heres what I got as far as prices:

Beef on the hoof, 1,200-1400 lbs. That's a 720-840 hanging weight. $55 slaughter/disposal fee, $0.85/lb per hanging lb, $12 tenderizing. Just to be on the safe side of calculations I assume that I will get 40% of the animal in an edible form. Hanging weight incudes the bone that is still in there.
1,200 lbs = (720*.85)+55 = $667 processing fee. 1200*40% = 480 lbs of meat. Cost to me, all cuts: 1.39/lb

Don't get too excited. Its a 4 yr old all grass fed bull. Probably would get a little less for him than that at the salebarn so its an all-around deal. He isn't some Ruth's Chris specimen. But he will be pretty damn good, and we make money on the deal - we could sell him and then pay another 2X as much buying similar parts and nuggets back at the store. Not to mention the calves.

He was born here so I didn't buy him. That's where the big cost differential is. Use the processing prices, not the cost per pound as a guide.

I have had a reservation for this animals since December and its coming due on June 1.
What breed is this?
 

lariat

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What breed is this?
Just a grade pasture bull. Half black angus and half dairy. He’s wasn’t supposed to exist but fences failed and here he is. I used him out of curiosity to see if I could get a little better bag on some range cows. I have done it before and it works to some degree but I can’t go too far with that without losing muscle on the calves. Like I said, he won’t bring much but he will eat just fine.
 

rjacobs

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Any of you guys ship? How much would it cost to ship a 1/4 beef to Southern california? These hipster farms are between 9.00 and 11.00 /# for this grass fed BS. Correct me if I’m wrong, but grass fed is way leaner? I want fat in my beef.
I’ve never done it, but Omaha steaks does it every day. For the right money I’ll do about anything, so if you’re really interested I’d be willing to look into it.
Omaha steaks is shipping like 4-6lb packages...

The cost to ship something like a quarter cow overnight or 2 day will be way high. You are talking ~150+lbs of meat plus package weight plus freezer gel packs. FedEx/UPS limits total ship weight to 150lbs per package I believe for overnight shipping. You would have to split into 2 or more containers.

Shipping heavy overnight packages costs A LOT.

I shipped ~100lbs total weight of fish/packaging from Alaska to Texas via FedEx 2 day and it was over 400 bucks. Now I understand thats Alaska to the CONUS but I would guess if you are trying to ship 200lbs total weight the cost wont be any LESS than 400 bucks. Shit I just shipped 2x 40lb cases of ammo via UPS ground and it was almost $100. Shipping costs are way out of line right now.

I would plan on your shipping cost(shipping, packaging, gel packs) adding AT LEAST $1.50(if not $2) lb.

So at the end of the day the $5-6 per lb cost guys on here are talking about will be at least 1.50-2 higher due to shipping costs.
 

rjacobs

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If I was paying $10/# for grass fed commie bullshit, I’d be tickled pink to pay $5/# for grain fed black angus, but that’s just my opinion.
im not arguing that.

So your other post says you sell at $3 a lb hanging weight. Then processing on top of that, lets say $1.50 lb(if you can get it processed which you said even you likely can not get a spot until next spring) plus, my guess, $1.50 lb shipped overnight(or 2 day). So $6 lb. Thats not a bad price for good quality meat. Im not arguing that. Just trying to point out that the "good deals" posted here, once you try to ship 150lbs of meat, frozen, overnight, turn into not so great of deals, especially considering long waits to get into the processor.
 

lariat

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If you want good beef for cheapest you possibly can: go by it on the hoof and do the deed in totality. Sale barn guys can help you out usually and be your proxy to buy your animal if you cant find a rancher (hard to believe, but maybe). Then go pick it up and start to work. It simply a matter of logistics and want-to. There is an upside: you wont forget the experience, you will learn something about the meat supply chain and you might find a like-minded bud somewhere along the way - you know, they guys the politicians ignore or call ignorant but love to live off the work of their backs... Plus it gets you away from grocery store cellophane.

I'm not kidding with this comment. It could be a very positive life experience.
 

Sixfivesavage

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You know, all the bullshit and personal opinions aside, I think there's a real opportunity here. Especially in my AO. We have a fair amount of small local cutters but I can count on one hand, probably still having fingers left over, how many hang longer than a week and dry age. To top it off, there's only a few that are actually well run, professional shops that can actually keep track of how they are suposed to be cutting when it comes to custom work. I've been curious before but more so now to look into the costs to start a cutting operation. I mean to do it right, not the kind of operation that started in the 40s or 50s and never updated or increased facilities. Cold storage to hang and age, say maybe a 30 head capacity. Maybe 2 professional cutters, vac seal and custom labeling. Holding pens and intake facilities that aren't a cobbled together maze. The biggest unknown to me is the cold storage, deep freeze and professional cutter costs. I might start looking into this a little more seriously.
 

MarinePMI

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You know, all the bullshit and personal opinions aside, I think there's a real opportunity here. Especially in my AO. We have a fair amount of small local cutters but I can count on one hand, probably still having fingers left over, how many hang longer than a week and dry age. To top it off, there's only a few that are actually well run, professional shops that can actually keep track of how they are suposed to be cutting when it comes to custom work. I've been curious before but more so now to look into the costs to start a cutting operation. I mean to do it right, not the kind of operation that started in the 40s or 50s and never updated or increased facilities. Cold storage to hang and age, say maybe a 30 head capacity. Maybe 2 professional cutters, vac seal and custom labeling. Holding pens and intake facilities that aren't a cobbled together maze. The biggest unknown to me is the cold storage, deep freeze and professional cutter costs. I might start looking into this a little more seriously.
Ever seen the home built walk in refers made with a cheap window A/C unit and a replacement thermostat? IIRC, they use pre fab’ed sheds, with foam insulation and aluminum sheets over it to make them. Thought about putting one together at my buddy’s place in MT for hunted game, but most years it’s already cold enough to just leave them hanging in a unheated garage...
 

McNamara0851

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im not arguing that.

So your other post says you sell at $3 a lb hanging weight. Then processing on top of that, lets say $1.50 lb(if you can get it processed which you said even you likely can not get a spot until next spring) plus, my guess, $1.50 lb shipped overnight(or 2 day). So $6 lb. Thats not a bad price for good quality meat. Im not arguing that. Just trying to point out that the "good deals" posted here, once you try to ship 150lbs of meat, frozen, overnight, turn into not so great of deals, especially considering long waits to get into the processor.
I got in early and have locker dates in October, November, and December, take your pick. Our locker is around $.75/#. I’m not trying to become an international meat dealer, but I would ship a 1/4 to that shit hole just to say I did it. I know there are people on here that don’t have any problem paying a premium for high quality shit. I don’t know what that is like because I’m a brokedick Jew, but I can appreciate it, and accommodate for it.
 

Sixfivesavage

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Ever seen the home built walk in refers made with a cheap window A/C unit and a replacement thermostat? IIRC, they use pre fab’ed sheds, with foam insulation and aluminum sheets over it to make them. Thought about putting one together at my buddy’s place in MT for hunted game, but most years it’s already cold enough to just leave them hanging in a unheated garage...
I thought about trying to convert a building I already have and going that route. I also want to look into the start up costs of doing a purpose built building like a commercial cold storage warehouse but on a smaller scale to hang enough to justify it and make it all work. Not sure what the numbers are yet, say 20, 30 or 50 head of space. I don't even know what a professional cutter can accomplish in a day. 3 head? 2? I mean going form a primal to vacpac ready. Teenagers can vac seal and grind. Id need a pro or two or 3 to cut.
 

hermosabeach

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not to derail this thread....

Years ago I went with friends to a wholesale only restaurant supply shop.. your resale info was required and a membership...

The fridge and freezer were walk through and they had orange parkas for you to borrow....
The half 1/2 Goats and 1/2 sheep on the hook in cheesecloth... Lots of bulk stuff for restaurants

I don't recall the name of the place, or I would post it up-

For those who don't have the ability to store 200-400 pounds of meat- Does anyone use Costco Business for bulk meats?
Different pricing than Costco- everything in bulk- cheese is all by the box. no small packages and restaurant equipment.


These places look similar to the wholesale place I went to in Dallas-


equipment only
 

Hobo Hilton

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not to derail this thread....

Years ago I went with friends to a wholesale only restaurant supply shop.. your resale info was required and a membership...

The fridge and freezer were walk through and they had orange parkas for you to borrow....
The half 1/2 Goats and 1/2 sheep on the hook in cheesecloth... Lots of bulk stuff for restaurants

I don't recall the name of the place, or I would post it up-

For those who don't have the ability to store 200-400 pounds of meat- Does anyone use Costco Business for bulk meats?
Different pricing than Costco- everything in bulk- cheese is all by the box. no small packages and restaurant equipment.


These places look similar to the wholesale place I went to in Dallas-


equipment only
I've been watching Costco for many years. I held Costco stock as well as being a member. After all the pandemic fiasco, I now "cast a weary eye" towards Costco. All Costco has to say is "There is going to be a shortage of ________" and suddenly there is a run on what ever Costco says will be in short supply. At least Walmart never tries that.

Hobo
 

Foul Mike

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The problem in my area is not the shortage of animals on the hoof, and there are plenty of them.

The problem is finding a slaughter/ butcher that will take the job on, let alone do it as you want it done. At this point , not getting too picky.

ALL in my area are booked out into next year. And I have looked around for the next available place to do it and they all are booked up into next year.

My problem is that we have 3 nice critters needing to go to slaughter and processing in November when they are finished out but we have NO place to take them and we do not have the facilities to do it ourselves.

Those local to the area, butchers are ALL over run and have more business than they can handle and take critters on as to who was first in line then go from there.

I don't know what we will do but do know we are in a World of Hurt.

I also think a lot of people think, "No Problem" just buy a steer from the local rancher and get all you want. Wrong again Hiawatha, who is going to do the butchering of that animal? Chances are it will not be YOU as you are not set up to do it.
 
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Sixfivesavage

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The problem in my area is not the shortage of animals on the hoof, and there are plenty of them.

The problem is finding a slaughter/ butcher that will take the job on, let alone do it as you want it done. At this point , not getting too picky.

ALL in my area are booked out into next year. And I have looked around for the next available place to do it and they all are booked up into next year.

My problem is that we have 3 nice critters needing to go to slaughter and processing in November when they are finished out but we have NO place to take them and we do not have the facilities to do it ourselves.

Those local to the area, butchers are ALL over run and have more business than they can handle and take critters on as to who was first in line then go from there.

I don't know what we will do but do know we are in a World of Hurt.

I also think a lot of people think, "No Problem" just buy a steer from the local rancher and get all you want. Wrong again Hiawatha, who is going to do the butchering of that animal? Chances are it will not be YOU as you are not set up to do it.
That is the same situation in a lot of places. Here in Maryland it's just as bad. I actually managed to luck out and get a few in to be killed in July. The next batch is November. After that, unless something changes everywhere is out till next yea....some next April. The ones set to go in July are coming to me from a connection in Kentucky that has 30 head ready to go now and nowhere to go with them.
 

Hobo Hilton

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The problem in my area is not the shortage of animals on the hoof, and there are plenty of them.

The problem is finding a slaughter/ butcher that will take the job on, let alone do it as you want it done. At this point , not getting too picky.

ALL in my area are booked out into next year. And I have looked around for the next available place to do it and they all are booked up into next year.

My problem is that we have 3 nice critters needing to go to slaughter and processing in November when they are finished out but we have NO place to take them and we do not have the facilities to do it ourselves.

Those local to the area, butchers are ALL over run and have more business than they can handle and take critters on as to who was first in line then go from there.

I don't know what we will do but do know we are in a World of Hurt.

I also think a lot of people think, "No Problem" just buy a steer from the local rancher and get all you want. Wrong again Hiawatha, who is going to do the butchering of that animal? Chances are it will not be YOU as you are not set up to do it.
Well, with all of these folks out of work.... They could attend a Butcher School and be finished with school in time to go to work on some of these issues ........... Better than bringin' in "seasonal workers" to process meat........... Just a thought.

Hobo

 

Seed tick

Sergeant of the Hide
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Nov 8, 2018
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Prices will be back to normal soon don’t jump the gun and panic buy. Even a half beef is a shit ton and very likely to wind up not being used up and becoming freezer burned. It’s hard to use up a couple hundred pounds of hamburger unless yo have a shit load of kids! My opinion.
 

lariat

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Feb 11, 2018
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Alright fellas, you want to start your own butcher shop? Well get the cooler, but get the manbuns, lumberjack jeans, supsenders and some more tats, cause you aint selling a damn thing unless you get with it:



And you need a blog about something related to artisanal carcasses. And death. Then life. In that order. May God help you if you don't use high end knives...
 
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BG94591

Sergeant of the Hide
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Jul 6, 2019
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Well, with all of these folks out of work.... They could attend a Butcher School and be finished with school in time to go to work on some of these issues ........... Better than bringin' in "seasonal workers" to process meat........... Just a thought.

Hobo

It appears I may be getting medically retired after this next surgery. I've long said that I’d love to become a butcher, guess I’ll be looking into it more serious especially since I’m going to leave Ca when it’s all said and done.
 
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TACC

Gunny Sergeant
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Jan 10, 2019
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If you want good beef for cheapest you possibly can: go by it on the hoof and do the deed in totality. Sale barn guys can help you out usually and be your proxy to buy your animal if you cant find a rancher (hard to believe, but maybe). Then go pick it up and start to work. It simply a matter of logistics and want-to. There is an upside: you wont forget the experience, you will learn something about the meat supply chain and you might find a like-minded bud somewhere along the way - you know, they guys the politicians ignore or call ignorant but love to live off the work of their backs... Plus it gets you away from grocery store cellophane.

I'm not kidding with this comment. It could be a very positive life experience.
This exactly.

I have been fortunate enough the last couple of years to get a 1/2 of beef and nowcmy wife and kids actually can taste the difference.
 

Hobo Hilton

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Pacific Northwest
If you want good beef for cheapest you possibly can: go by it on the hoof and do the deed in totality. Sale barn guys can help you out usually and be your proxy to buy your animal if you cant find a rancher (hard to believe, but maybe). Then go pick it up and start to work. It simply a matter of logistics and want-to. There is an upside: you wont forget the experience, you will learn something about the meat supply chain and you might find a like-minded bud somewhere along the way - you know, they guys the politicians ignore or call ignorant but love to live off the work of their backs... Plus it gets you away from grocery store cellophane.

I'm not kidding with this comment. It could be a very positive life experience.
I agree 100%.... Call it "Field Craft".......... As with many other crafts, someone will show you a few pointers along the way. My Dad raised me with a saying that stuck with me.. "Son, Do something, even if it's wrong". I've done a lot wrong. Each time was a learning experience... Go for it.

Hobo
 

lariat

Private
Minuteman
Feb 11, 2018
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Your only half right.
Who the hell said I love corporations?
It was a joke...Dexter is the oldest and one of the largest knife corporations in the USA. Therefore probably not hipster approved.
 
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Snuby642

Old Salt
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Feb 11, 2017
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Very protective of my 20$ dexter.

Handiest knife I ever had.
Have pumas, aj henkles allkinds over long life of fish and game cleaning.

That thing is a meat maker.
Been in every butcher shop or processing plant I have seen.

I was born a basterd but got a dad that adopted me when I was 4.

I ain't thin skinned about it.lol

Just kidding you.
 

lariat

Private
Minuteman
Feb 11, 2018
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Here you go. These guys have some pretty legit videos other than this one. They prove its totally possible and take the mystery out of it. It'll take longer than the video, but that time gets spent one way or the other.


And I'm now looking deeper into those Dexters. Thanks for helping me spend money.
 

hermosabeach

Betty Ford Center
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Feb 13, 2012
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Betty Ford Clinic
If you have a COSTCO membership- you can go to Costco Business- bulk meat-bulk items

Here are my local COSTCO business prices today
Halal Chicken - 40 Pound boxes
Boneless Skinless Jumbo thighs $1.19/ pound
Bone in Thigh $0.65
Drumsticks $0.59

New Zealand Whole Lamb $3.99/ Pound + $10 off per package
New Zealand Lamb Foreshanks - $3.99/ Pound (ave 25 pounds)
Lamb Shoulders $3.99

Halal Goat Carcass $5.49/ Pound

The beef prices are decent.... Brisket was $6.99/ Pound
 
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