Advanced Marksmanship Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

j-huskey

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Based on the two topics, "Is Marksmanship Dead" and Equipment Versus Shooter" and the comments engendered.
I know nobody here needs to read what is about to be posted, but it's been around a long time and used by a lot of people and covers fundamentals pretty well. I know, reticle is mispelled throughout the whole thing.
And it's not about iron sights, I don't have that one handy right now, but maybe I can dig the iron sight one out and post it too. Maybe.

*HOW TO HOLD AND SHOOT YOUR RIFLE: Aka Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

*How to Hold, *Aim, *Eye Relief, *Sight Alignment, *Sight Picture, *Breathing, *Trigger Manipulation, *Follow Through, and *Recovery.

Now that your rifle fits you properly and you have learned to properly clean and maintain your rifle, you must learn how to hold the rifle. ACCURACY IS A FUNCTION OF CONSISTENCY, BOTH WITH THE RIFLE AND AMMUNITION, AND THE SHOOTER'S ACTIONS. You must hold the rifle the same way each time. You will practice holding the rifle, your sight picture, your breathing, and trigger manipulation through dry firing. You will practice building a good steady, stable, solid position each time, bone on bone, not held by muscle power. Although you have to exert some muscle control, the position should be a natural relaxed position to avoid muscle fatigue, tension, and shaking that occurs after muscles are overextended for any period of time. You will check your natural point of aim before each shot. NATURAL POINT OF AIM is a position that allows the rifle to point naturally at the target without any muscle tension required to hold it on point of aim. You should keep the same position each time, changing nothing, to maintain consistency, to keep your natural point of aim the same each time. Before beginning this portion, or preceding sections, or any exercises, you should stretch first to loosen up your muscles. Besides the natural relaxing effect of stretching, it helps to prepare you mentally as well. Being physically fit will help you shoot better, and if you are not physically fit, you should make it a point to become fit.

*HOW TO HOLD YOUR RIFLE:
Assume the prone supported firing position.
The front of the rifle will rest either on a bipod attached to the stock or on a sandbag placed under the front of the stock.
Use the nonfiring hand to support the butt of the rifle. Place your hand next to your chest and rest the TIP of the butt of the rifle on top of your hand. Ball your hand into a fist to raise the butt of the rifle or relax your fist to lower the butt of the rifle. A preferred method is to use a sock filled with sand or a small sand bag placed in your non firing hand and squeeze it to raise the rifle butt and release the bag to lower the rifle butt. Using this sock or bag method lessens body contact with the rifle and can eliminate an added human variable.
Place the butt of the rifle firmly in the pocket of the shoulder. The sniper can place a pad in his clothing in the pocket of his shoulder to reduce pulse beat and breathing movement.
With the firing hand, grip the the small or pistol grip of the stock. Using the middle through little fingers, exert a slight rearward pull to keep the butt of the rifle firmly in the pocket of the shoulder. Place the thumb over the top of the pistol grip of the stock. Place the index or trigger finger on the trigger and insure it does not touch the stock and does not disturb the lay of the rifle when the trigger is pulled.
Find a comfortable position for your elbows that provide the greatest support for you and your rifle without creating a strain.
Place your cheek in the same place on the stock each time. This is called the stock weld. Changing your position changes sight alignment and will cause misplaced shots.

*AIMING THE RIFLE:
Begin the aiming process by aligning the rifle with the target when assuming a firing position. THE RIFLE SHOULD POINT NATURALLY AT THE DESIRED AIMING POINT. No muscular tension or movement should be neccessary to hold the rifle on target. To check the Natural Point of Aim (NPA), you assume a comfortable, STABLE, firing position. Place your cheek on the stock at the correct stock weld and breath, and entering the natural respiratory pause, look away from the scope moving only your eye and relax. Let the rifle drift to its natural point of aim, then look back through the scope. If the crosshairs remain on the correct position on the target, the natural point of aim is correct.
If the NPA is not correct, you must change your body position to bring the sights on the target. If muscles are used to bring the rifle to NPA, the muscles will relax when the rifle is fired and the rifle will begin to move to its NPA. Because this movement begins just before the weapon discharges, the rifle is moving at the bullet leaves the muzzle. This causes displaced shots with no apparent cause as recoil disguises the movement. By adjusting the rifle and body as a single unit, rechecking, and readjusting as necessary, you achieve a true natural point of aim. Once this position of established, you will them aim the rifle at the exact point on the target. Aiming involves three areas, eye relief, sight alignment, and sight picture.

*EYE RELIEF:
This is the distance from the firing eye to the scope tube. This distance is fairly constant with a scope. You should take care to avoid injury by the scope tube striking the eyebrow during recoil.
You should place your head as upright as possible behind the scope with your eye directly behind the scope. This head placement allows the muscles around your eye to relax. Incorrect head placement causes you to have to look out the corner of your eye resulting in muscle strain, causing blurred vision and eye strain. Eye strain can be avoided by not staring through the scope for long periods of time and correct stock weld alleviates eye strain as well by maintaining consistent eye relief.

*SIGHT ALIGNMENT:
Sight alignment is the relationship between the crosshairs (reticle) and field of view. You must place your head behind the scope so a full field of view appears in the scope tube with NO DARK SHADOWS OR CRESENTS. Center the reticle in a full field of view with the vertical crosshair straight up to ensure the scope is not canted.

*SIGHT PICTURE:
Sight picture is centering the reticle with a full field of view on the target as seen by you. Place the reticle crosshairs on what portion of the target you wish to hit.

*BREATHING:
You must exercise breathing control during the aiming process. Breathing while trying to aim, with the natural up and down motion of the chest while breathing, causes the rifle to move up and down. Up and down movement occurs while laying down. Breathing movement can be side to side when sitting at a bench rest type table when your body is against the table. You must therefore accomplish sight alignment while breathing and finish aiming while holding your breath. You do this by inhaling, exhaling, and stop at the moment of natural respiratory pause before beginning to inhale again.
A respiratory cycle lasts four to five seconds. Inhalation and exhalation take only about two seconds, thus between each respiratory cycle there is a pause of two to three seconds. This pause can be extended to ten seconds without any special effort or unpleasant sensations. You should fire during this pause when your breathing muscles are relaxed. This avoids strain on the diaphragm.
You should assume your firing position and breath naturally until your hold begins to settle.
The respiratory pause should never feel un-natural. If it is too long, the body suffers from oxygen deprivation and begins to send out signals to resume breathing. These signals produce involuntary movements of the diaphragm which interfere with the shooters concentration and lack of movement needed to make a shot.

*TRIGGER CONTROL:
Trigger control is the most important fundamental of sniper marksmanship. It is defined as causing the rifle to fire when the sight picture is at its very best, without causing the rifle to move. Trigger Squeeze on the other hand is defined as the independent action of the forefinger on the trigger with a uniformly increasing pressure on the trigger straight to the rear until the rifle fires. Trigger Control is the last task to be accomplished before the rifle fires.
Proper trigger control occurs when the sniper places his firing finger as low on the trigger as possible and still clears the trigger guard, thereby achieving maximum mechanical advantage. He engages the trigger with that part of his firing finger (middle of the pad of the last digit) that allows him to pull the trigger straight to the rear. In order to avoid transferring movement of the finger to the entire rifle, the sniper should see daylight between the trigger finger and the stock as he squeezes the trigger straight to the rear. He fires the weapon when the reticle is in a position to insure a properly placed shot, or when the reticle is on target.
As the stability of a firing position decreases, the wobble area increases. The larger the wobble area, the harder it is to fire the shot without reacting to it, attempting to influence the sight placement when the trigger breaks. This reaction occurs when the sniper:
1. Anticipates recoil. The firing shoulder begins to move forward just before the rifle fires, thus pushing the rifle out of line with the target.
2. Jerks the Trigger. The trigger finger moves the trigger in a quick, choppy, spasmodic attempt to fire the shot before the reticle can move from the desired point of aim.
3. Flinches. The sniper's entire body (or parts thereof) overreacts to the anticipated noise or recoil (jerks). This is usually due to unfamiliarity with the weapon.
4. Avoids Recoil. The sniper tries to avoid recoil or noise by moving away from the weapon or by closing the firing eye just before the weapon fires. This again is caused by unfamiliarity with the weapon and a lack of knowledge of the weapon's actions upon firing.
Trigger control is best handled by by assuming a stable position, adjusting on the target, and beginning a breathing cycle. As the sniper exhales the final breath approaching the natural respiratory pause, he secures his finger on the trigger. As the reticle settles on the target at the desired point of aim, and the natural respiratory pause is entered, the sniper applies initial pressure to the trigger. He increases the tension on the trigger during the respiratory pause as long as the reticle remains on the desired point of aim to insure a properly placed shot. If the reticle moves away from the desired point of aim, and the respiratory pause is free of strain or tension, the sniper stops increasing the tension on the trigger, waits for the reticle to return to the desired point of aim, and then continues to squeeze the trigger. This is trigger control. If movement is too large for recovery, or if the respiratory pause has become uncomfortable (extended too long), then the sniper should whenever possible, release the pressure off the trigger and start the respiratory cycle again.

*FOLLOW THROUGH:
Applying the fundamentals increases the odds of a well aimed shot being fired. There are however, additional skills, that when mastered, make the first round correct hit even more of a certainty. One of these skills is follow through.
a. This is the act of continuing to apply all the sniper marksmanship fundamentals as the weapon fires as well as after the weapon fires. Follow through consists of:
* Keeping the head in firm contact with the stock (stock weld) upon firing and after firing.
* Keeping the finger on the trigger pulling all the way to the rear when and after the weapon fires.
* Continuing to look through the scope when and after the weapon fires.
* Insuring the muscles stay relaxed when and after the weapon fires.
* Avoid reacting to the recoil or noise during and after firing.
* Releasing the trigger only after the recoil has stopped.
b. Good follow through insures that the weapon is allowed to fire and recoil naturally, and the sniper/rifle combination reacts as a single unit to such actions.

*CALLING THE SHOT:
Calling the shot is being able to tell where the bullet should impact on the target. The sniper must be able to accurately call the shots. Proper follow through will aid in calling the shot. The dominant factor in calling the shot is, whereever the reticle is when the shot is fired. This location is called the final focus point.
 

Sterling Shooter

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

I recall marksmanship being connected, at an earlier time, with the word theory. Today's doctrine, which I use, originating with the USAMU, is, very much, similar to the older, I believe, text you posted. Perhaps, this indicates that proven marksmanship concepts are now considered to be fact, rather than theory.

It appears that only that the arrangement of material and emphasis has been reworked, perhaps to help students better grasp the concepts rather than be overwhelmed by them.

 
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Victor N TN

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Greg Langelius *</div><div class="ubbcode-body">This needs to be a sticky. </div></div>

+1
 

kraigWY

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Unless I missed it, three things were left out:

FRONT SIGHT
FRONT SIGHT
FRONT SIGHT

Focal Point on Iron sights HAS TO BE the front sight.
 

j-huskey

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: kraigWY</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Unless I missed it, three things were left out:

FRONT SIGHT
FRONT SIGHT
FRONT SIGHT

Focal Point on Iron sights HAS TO BE the front sight. </div></div>

You didn't miss it, I left irons out on purpose, I did it for a scope since this is Snipershide.
For iron sight stuff, I highly recommend people join www.long-range.com . All the iron sight and high power stuff a person could ever want.
 

CD0311

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Fundamentals- Irons...


AIMING: The relationship between the shooting eye rear sight and front sight aka correct sight alignment, correct sight picture

BREATHING: Using the natural respiratory pause to take the shot, aka-don't hold your breath extend the pause to shoot.

TRIGGER CONTROL: The skillful manipulation of the trigger straight to the rear allowing the rifle to shoot with out disturbing CORRECT SIGHT ALIGNMENT AND CORRECT SIGHT PICTURE

FOLLOW THROUGH: The continued application of the fundamentals through the recoil with out disturbing, you guessed it, CORRECT SIGHT ALIGNMENT and CORRECT SIGHT PICTURE
 

Sterling Shooter

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

For those who want to shoot better, it's necessary to first know what's important to good shooting.

Some shooters don't know the first two things about shooting; and yet, since they can execute the firing task, that's to say, aim and pull the trigger to discharge the gun, they think they know how to shoot. They don't think there's anything else to know , or learn about. I call these trigger pullers "plinkermen".

Although I think jhuskey covered it all, here's my check list of what I've come to understand to be important to good shooting.

Principles, Sight Alignment
Trigger Control
(emphasis on Sight Focus, Follow-Through and Sight Picture)

Position
Elements, Natural Point of Aim
Muscular Relaxation
Bone/Artificial Support

Position
Factors, Elbow Placement
Firing Hand/Grip
Butt to Shoulder
Stock-Weld
Non Firing Hand
Breathing

Target Analysis/Shot Call

Grouping/Zeroing

Equipment, Data Book
Sling
Spotting Scope
Rifle/Sights
Ammunition

Conditions, Wind/Wind Formula
Weather/Temperature

To benefit from all these "things" that are a part of good shooting, the shooter must call the shot and analyze to gain CONSISTENCY where consistency was lost, or never found.
 
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Accuracy1st

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

I have to say I am very surprised on how many members are NOT in the Advanced Markmanship forum, that is unless they already know everything( I guess it's possible). Good article, the basics of markmanship are often overlooked, very refreshing to see.
THX,

Maybe we should rename this forum Gals & Guns for sale
grin.gif
I am sure it'll be full then....
 

waveone

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Excellent post !

Any thoughts on other positions such as sitting and kneeeling.


Indeed this should be a sticky
 

louboyd

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

The above discussion is excellent on control a rifle, but three areas were only lightly touched on by Sterling Shooter. Those are:
Range measurement/estimation.
Wind measurement/estimation.
Practical echniques for compensating for drop and wind deflection.

I don't diminish the requirement for proper gun handling and self control, but without correction for the trajectory the point of aim won't be close to where the bullet impacts, partcularly at longer ranges. Technology provides precise prediction of drop. The abilty to dope wind reliably is in my opinion the most important sign of a skilled marksman.
(I don't claim to be a skilled marksman, just a student trying to learn).

 

j-huskey

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

The reigning national champions in most of the shooting disciplines for this year have stated in print more than once, the fundamentals of marksmanship are the most important basic building block for a shooter.
For a shooter to not master the fundamentals, or re-check them each time they fire a shot, is a risk at failure. The reigning champions will tell you they have a mental checklist of the fundamentals they run through each shot.

The US Military uses these fundamentals in all disciplines to bring new shooters up to a level where they can "appreciate" the need to know more advanced topics like range and wind measurement and estimation, along with knowledge of compensation from drop and wind deflection.

Mastery of the fundamentals has been seen here on this board to be one of the most continually asked questions of a generation not raised with firearms or the access to a good coach and controlled practice.

Knowledge of the fundamentals without practial experience is not going to produce a skilled marksman. Knowledge and poor practice will not produce a skilled marksman.
Knowledge, positive practice, lessons learned, corrections made, and continued practice under known conditions build a basic foundation to a skilled marksman.
Once that foundation is laid, the marksman should advance to the topics mentioned by Mr. Boyd.
Too much, too fast, is detrimental to a student trying to learn.
 

Greg Langelius *

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Second that. I'm having my problems right now, and I'd be flatly amazed if there wasn't at least some component of that with its basis in bybassing the basics. I need to get my butt back onto the range with the .22LR and do some more basic training. I can't afford to be wasting good C/F ammo on bad marksmanship.

Greg
 

Greg Langelius *

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

I keep going back to the same concept: Marksmanship is a perishable skill. We become complacent about our skills at our own peril.

Practice is mandatory.

Practice without concrete goals, objective observation, and constructive feedback is meaningless. Those who practice alone are often setting themselves up for failure. It can be done, but it's really just an additional complication being added to an already complex task.

The object of my practice is to simplfy that complexity by emulating that adage someone else here has for a signature line. Amateurs practice until they can get it done right. Professionals practice until they cannot do it wrong.

My .22LR ammo consumption is somewhere between five and ten times my centerfire ammo consumption. And maybe it's not enough...

Greg
 

ukshooter

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Great post
Shootings a strange game,there's a mental concept.
I've entered a few competitions where i thought i hadn't a cat in hell's change of winning.So i shot just for the experience,totally expecting nothing but would end up winning.
Them there is the competition where you think you've got a chance,and i think you are trying too hard and you loose.
So to me a great shooter is a man who,can switch off and just shoot in auto pilot.
But how do you get into the ZONE,is it a form of meditation ?.
I've shot really good with a bad hang overs,or starting with the flu.
Well that's my 2 cents.

 

oughtsix

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

I have found that there is more than a mental concept to shooting, but rather shooting itself is a mental concept. It's easy to get caught up in the great pissing contest of haivng the latest and greatest super tactical gear and the custom rifles, and while this is very important, it is more inportant that you go out and shoot what you have, as much as you can. When your skill exceeds the consistency of your equipment, upgrade. If you can afford this from the start, then go and do it. You won't be hurt by it at all. But the rifle doesn't operate itself. Mental training is key, because, as ukshooter said, you have to switch off your active mind, and just use what you know. You might get away with winging it in practice, or a low pressure situation, but when the stress comes, and time is winding down, there's no time for thinking. The shot plan HAS to be second nature in order to shoot on the level that we all would like to shoot at, and some here do. Your brain is not preprogrammed with the shooting "auto pilot" program. You have to go out and develop the program and modify it yourself as you learn. Anyone can fire a rifle, but few have the discipline to realize that they (myself inluded) are but a student of the sport. I haven't even started on the LR jounrney yet. I'm just a leftover from a high school 3P team. I'm working on getting back into it somehow. Funds just don't allow right now.
 
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Kev

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Excellent jhuskey, that's the kind of stuff I was looking for. Again, being new to this long gun/sniping stuff, Im looking for the basics first as a good foundation, then build from there, but I don't want to start this off on the wrong foot and years down the road and realize I never learned the proper way from the beginning.

Again, just learning/starting rifle and need everything I can get for LE.

IF there are any materials, resources, forums, books, etc that I can learn from the beginning/foundation up, let me know.

Again, great article!
 
Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

This post should be required reading.

What would be good (because as was said earlier, every now and then we get so used to what we know we forget that others don't know the same), is a thread on how to learn your gun.

So, for someone who gets a new gun, maybe a first gun, or even a new optic, or switching ammo:

How to zero your new gun at a particular range,
How to make a data card for your gun,
How to learn how to range find on your particular gun's optics

etc.

I know this information is around on the forums, but it would be nice to see it combined all in one place.
 

Barrel Nut

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Thanks for an excellent post. I just printed it out and am going to read it before every practice session and every match until it is all second nature. This is exaclty the concisely worded information that I was looking for.
 

happichap

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

This really is great material. I too am going to print this and make sure I'm following the "rules" to do better every time.

Thanks
 

Tango Alpha

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Huskey's 2000 word post on Marksmanship Fundamentals is better than most articles you would have to PAY to read in national publication. A sincere thank you from serious shooters everywhere.
 

ah6oy

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Being a jerk figuring I don't need any help with my shooting so I don't feel like reading the writings..... Did the stuff mention practice? Like always you can read your whole life away but practice is what makes even a bad shooter shotting all wrong even better. Hard to teach a guy not to practice bad habits.
 

j-huskey

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Practice is in there a couple of times.

Tiger Woods says that "practice does not make perfect. Practice makes permanent. Only perfect practice makes perfect".

Gotta know what to practice when your performance is poor. If somebody doesn't put it out there for those who need it, those who don't know, or won't read and apply, will continue to perform poorly. Their choice.

"Hard to teach a guy not to practice bad habits" is only hard if the student is improperly motivated and doesn't WANT to improve.

Those who want to improve and become better, with the right knowledge and coaching, will reduce their bad habits and do better, but first, they have to be shown, one way or the other, the right way to do it.

"Hard to teach a guy not to practice bad habits" IS hard when you deal with a loser mentality. Winners step up to the plate and put out the effort.
 

JRose

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

It's threads like this that really help out new shooters like me...
 

82-Pb

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Kmussack hit the nail on the head. His son is a marksman bar nun. when all seems wrong.....fundamentals fundamentals FUNDAMENTALS!!
 

Sterling Shooter

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

I hope all who have viewed this thread, wanting to become better shooters, have gleaned something here which will promote their success. Others, however, I'm sure, will not visit here, as they think they already know how to shoot. They can aim and pull the trigger; and, perceiving that executing the firing task is the the equivalent of knowing how to shoot, they simply are satisfied that there's nothing more to learn.
 
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PFC FMJ

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Wanted to say thanks to all who contributed to this thread. Got out to the range this afternoon and applied some of the info covered (to the best of my novice ability), with noticeable success.

The biggest difference I noticed was the NPOA (natural point of aim). I caught myself forcing shots that were unnatural (some pre-bang, some post-bang), but I knew the reason bad shots were bad. Two hours and 40 shots later I had made some real progress. Consistency is an issue, but I was putting shots where I wanted them to go the majority of the time.

Funny story, some clown with a beautiful, <span style="text-decoration: underline">loud</span> (maybe 300 win mag?) showed up and took the station next to me, put his silohette target out to about 20 yards, shot 20-30 rounds in about 10 minutes (and about 10 MOA), packed his shit and left. All of the rest of us just kind of looked at each other and rolled our eyes. What a waste. I had this thread printed out in my ruck. I almost gave it to him...not sure he could read though.
 

LAR Dragoon

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Good job jhuskey, and thanks for sharing!

The Tiger Wood's quote is a GREAT perspective and sooo true.
 

LAR Dragoon

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Nice!
Marines must be smarter now though, no pictures. ; )
 

Sterling Shooter

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

It's very difficult for some to identify what needs to be improved, as they don't know anything about the principles, elements and factors which effect the corollary of POA and POI. Even folks who have no trouble calling the shot, still may not have a clue about why the shot was on or off call, or what to do about it, i.e. adjust sight, apply smoother trigger control, get a more consistent stock-weld, favor wind, etc.

I'm glad this thread's available to those who are, indeed, interested in developing their marksmanship skills to a more extraordinary level; yet, it should be understood, only shooters who put their brain into it, analyzing it until corrections necessary are self evident, will ever get to the highest plateau's.

IThe sorriest folks are those who think they know how to do it, shooting at LR, chasing the spotter for non-existent wind, when the culprit was really just poor basic prone marksmanship, or a bad zero.
 

Greg Langelius *

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Two eyes are never enough because they are confined to but a single vantage, and interpreted by but a single viewpoint.

The best attribute of a questing mind is openness.

One seldom learns a concept fully until one is forced to put that concept into terms another may understand. Coach and learner work best when the roles are alternated.

Who learns alone may never recognize error until it becomes ingrained. Practice without objective criticism is never completely effective.

When learning ends, so does progress.

Greg
 

Sterling Shooter

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Greg,

That's too deep, man. Of course, you're right; but, since all firing takes place at the gun, only the shooter knows how the shot looked. Sooner, or later the shooter's got to do the analyzing.
 

oughtsix

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Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

I must say Greg, I've been reading what you write here for the better part of 5 years now, and you never cease to inspire me. I'm sure I'm not alone.
 

Greg Langelius *

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AZ
Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

That's my job. Whenever I do something new, something new is being learned by someone. Usually that somebody is me. If I were to hide that light under a bushel, I'd be a dirty rat, but even more, I'd not be doing my job. I need to pass it on, especially when it comes together and forms insights. It is by such insights that we understand our world better than the dumb animals ever can. It, along with error (mankind's greatest learning tool), is what makes us human; and if I am anything, I am human.

Thank you for the compliments, but really; I'm just doing what we were all put down here to do..., help one another.

Greg
 
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82-Pb

Private
Minuteman
May 15, 2005
47
0
Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

HHAAAWWWWAWAWAWAWA!!
Greg....I am but a Grasshopper! you are the MASTER...(silents all)...
 

James H. Graham

Private
Minuteman
Feb 6, 2007
13
0
SA TX
Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Huskey, great run down- we all can critique from the sidelines- but you summed it up. I detect a Devil Dog raising in the write up. I was a shooter and instructor for over 25 years in MC- and one of my Mental Aspects teaching Marksmanship is to brainwash "front sight" into the student. I see you left it out on purpose- so in scope guns I brain wash the cross hairs as to detract the rattles from the shooter when shooting an animal, taliban, or winning a match.
Glad to see so many Devil Dogs on board. Most will know what the bottom means.

S/F
Dogs of War, (Dimpled Smokey), MC Matches on Demilles Team, MC Dist, USA Dist (DCM), 7 or 8 time Pres 100, HM 16 years w M14, High Desert, Buffalo Soldier, 4 time NTT, 3 Time ITT, Double Gold, lots of "has been" stuff mainly wind dummy for the team, HA.
 

05069394

Private
Minuteman
Apr 25, 2008
13
0
38
Oxford, England
Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Been shooting airguns for years with mixed results and no real tuition. This gives me some good theory to work with now i've moved on to rimfire/centrefire shooting!

Thanks Huskey
 

Wind50cal

Sergeant
Full Member
Minuteman
Nov 29, 2003
105
2
62
Knob Creek,Kentucky
Re: Fundamentals of Marksmanship.

Outstanding Post! I think what was missed in "front sight, front sight, front sight" was made up in, "NPA,NPA,NPA" Ha!

It's funny, no matter how qualified of a shooter you happen to be..... "the mistake" is always from failure of following the basics! It is my greatest pleasure to introduce shooters new and old to proper marksmanship. I always recommend the CMP's Basic Marksmanship manual by the AMU. This will be a another great one to type out and hand them!
I appreciate each one of you on this board for your time and commitment! Happy Holidays to all!