I'm an idiot and could use some help

Hoyt7mm

Bow Shooter
Belligerents
Apr 6, 2017
401
71
34
West Bend, Wisconsin
Last week I deprimed and sonic cleaned about 300 pieces of brass in preparation for a run through the AMP. After cleaning, I put the brass in the oven at 230 deg F to dry for an hour. I shut the oven off, but didn't remove the brass (you may guess where this is going). Fast forward to today and I preheated the oven to 400 deg, with the brass still inside. Once preheated, I realized my mistake and immediately removed the brass. So, did I just ruin 300 pieces?
 

whatsupdoc

Major Hide Member
Belligerents
Minuteman
Dec 12, 2017
1,049
965
119
I doubt you annealed the brass at 400 deg, how long were they heated ?
 

hafejd30

Gunny Sergeant
Hessian
Belligerents
Minuteman
Feb 27, 2019
944
768
99
30
Wilson, MI
From mass reloading.com

Brass is annealed by heating it to a certain temperature for a certain amount of time. The higher the annealing temperature, the shorter the time required to anneal. The grain structure of the brass begins to change - indicating the start of annealing - at just under 500 degrees Fahrenheit. At 600 degrees F, brass will anneal in one hour. At 800 degrees F, brass will take only a few seconds to anneal.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Hoyt7mm and Alabusa

Hoyt7mm

Bow Shooter
Belligerents
Apr 6, 2017
401
71
34
West Bend, Wisconsin
From mass reloading.com

Brass is annealed by heating it to a certain temperature for a certain amount of time. The higher the annealing temperature, the shorter the time required to anneal. The grain structure of the brass begins to change - indicating the start of annealing - at just under 500 degrees Fahrenheit. At 600 degrees F, brass will anneal in one hour. At 800 degrees F, brass will take only a few seconds to anneal.
Thanks. I read that as well when initially panicking. I guess I'm just hoping for more verification
 

hafejd30

Gunny Sergeant
Hessian
Belligerents
Minuteman
Feb 27, 2019
944
768
99
30
Wilson, MI
Thanks. I read that as well when initially panicking. I guess I'm just hoping for more verification
Not many people have probably tested this. Best bet is probably edit your title with something more along the lines of heating case heads up to 400 degrees etc. that’s where the issue of failure will occur. Some here are very knowledgeable in metals and would be more of a help if they see your title as such.

I say your good to go. But I’m not a metallurgist and would hate to see something go wrong by suggesting you just role with it
 

BCMulx

Sergeant of the Hide
Belligerents
Minuteman
May 20, 2020
111
60
34
Email the guys at AMP. They're pretty responsive and would know 100%.

99.9% you're completely fine.
 

Mad_Charlie

Sergeant
Belligerents
Aug 28, 2012
373
5
22
68
West Central Fl.
Make note to yourself. Always check oven before heating, never know if wife or child left something in there.
Can't help much on the annealing, sorry.
 

El Cid 92

Medic
Belligerents
Sep 25, 2011
124
65
34
Collierville, TN
Bet you're probably OK. Giraud recommends Templaq 450 stripe down the case head and 750 at the neck.

So if you heated to 400F at the case head for a limited time. Bet you're OK.

Take 5 cases, Load them 1gr or so below your usual load and test. Inspect the cases and "feel" the inside of the case to see if failure is developing.

Oh... and I always check the oven when turning on. You can't imagine the mess that a cake in a tupperware case makes at 350degrees.

BTDT.

Andrew
 
  • Like
Reactions: larryh128