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The double standard of “going green”

TurboTrout

Two Star General
Full Member
Minuteman
Oct 30, 2020
5,995
6,458
East Coast
Little food for thought


So gas/diesel cars and trucks have to meet more and more crazy efficient requirements, or pay taxes or be outlawed

But green energy BS…. has no requirements on how efficient it has to be

Solar doesn’t have some requirement needing more and more watts per sqft per year, nor do electric cars have to get X range per charge

If these fucks didn’t have double standards they wouldn’t have any standards at all




*side note, recently got a Uber, I drove a shit moving truck 1.7hrs to drop it off, had the drag coefficient of a barn, took a 1/4 tank, I got a Uber back, turned out to be a under 1yr old electric car, old man driving it very conservative, the drive back in this POS was 2hrs….plus a 45 min “lunch” as the $60,000 shit box glorified golf cart couldn’t make it without recharging and we were lucky to find a high speed charging station 😂


So poorly maintained moving truck does it in 1.7, brand new hot shit green electric BS takes 2.7 for the same trip, I’m a car guy and have English stuff that’s far from reliable, but having a electric car is living your life around the car, who the fuck has time for that and had we not found a high speed charging station it would have taken twice the time to charge
 
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"Going Green" to save the planet is the con, going green is your green money going in the elites pockets. When AOC came into office she stated life will be over in 12 years without The Green New Deal , we have 9 years left to live unless the government can have all your money then they will give you another 12 years.......
 
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I’m a car guy and have English stuff that’s far from reliable, but having a electric car is living your life around the car, who the fuck has time for that
I hope any other car guys caught this and understand it. For a limey Brit car guy to say another car is expensive, inefficient, & time consuming is fucking incredible

P.S. I’m a German car guy so I get it. It’s just a different flavor. Our deal is being overly complicated and leaks oil everywhere
 
Going green is just a mantra disguising the fact that we humans are wretched beings destroying ourselves for the sake of convenience
 
Fuck going green! I wanna go blue! :cool:


You can do that if you have a pool just drop a 220V extension cord in there with the end cut off and glue the breaker on.
 
*side note, recently got a Uber, I drove a shit moving truck 1.7hrs to drop it off, had the drag coefficient of a barn, took a 1/4 tank, I got a Uber back, turned out to be a under 1yr old electric car, old man driving it very conservative, the drive back in this POS was 2hrs….plus a 45 min “lunch” as the $60,000 shit box glorified golf cart couldn’t make it without recharging and we were lucky to find a high speed charging station 😂


So poorly maintained moving truck does it in 1.7, brand new hot shit green electric BS takes 2.7 for the same trip, I’m a car guy and have English stuff that’s far from reliable, but having a electric car is living your life around the car, who the fuck has time for that and had we not found a high speed charging station it would have taken twice the time to charge

How long was this trip?

Current electric cars are very good about telling you how much range you have left before recharging is required, it sounds like the uber driver was doing a trip that they didn't have the range for. Most of the higher end electric cars have 200 to 350 mile range on a charge depending on the model as well as the driving type.

In some Northern European countries, the charging infrastructure is well built out and convenient to get to, as well as being quick to use.
In the USA decent charging infrastructure is probably a decade away, so Electric cars work best if you can charge them at home / work and have enough range for all your driving on a regular basis. Long trips are just not all that easy to do quickly.

Another side note is that the fast chargers can cost easily two or three times more than charging at home / work which negates much of the savings.

In a more city / urban setting, an electric car makes a lot of sense for a delivery driver / uber driver / taxi that is part time and can do a full day of driving on a charge and then charge back to full when at home / work parking, because they excel in stop and start driving without putting as much wear on a vehicle.
Also currently charging at home / work is way cheaper than gasoline (don't worry the feds have a plan to ruin EVERYBODY'S ability to drive without the government totally soaking you with taxes).

BUT, another but, the higher cost of the vehicle negates some of those savings, so you have to push your vehicle to 60k or more before you break even without government subsidies. With government subsidies you may be at break even from mile 0
In my case, my daily commute is $15 in gasoline vs $3.50 in electricity so close to $3k savings per year
If you live in AK or somewhere with a high cost of electricity, it may be actually a lot more expensive to drive an electric car.
 
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I don't have any issues with electric cars and if you want to own one that's your own business. I live in a rural area and frankly don't work for me. What I am opposed to is the government dictating what type of car I should drive to pursue an agenda. There is nothing green about green energy and extremely inefficient from a resource utilization standpoint. In the pursuit of their green religion there is a great deal of environmental externalities being created but we don't see because it is happening primarily on other continents.
 
How long was this trip?

Current electric cars are very good about telling you how much range you have left before recharging is required, it sounds like the uber driver was doing a trip that they didn't have the range for. Most of the higher end electric cars have 200 to 350 mile range on a charge depending on the model as well as the driving type.

In some Northern European countries, the charging infrastructure is well built out and convenient to get to, as well as being quick to use.
In the USA decent charging infrastructure is probably a decade away, so Electric cars work best if you can charge them at home / work and have enough range for all your driving on a regular basis. Long trips are just not all that easy to do quickly.

Another side note is that the fast chargers can cost easily two or three times more than charging at home / work which negates much of the savings.

In a more city / urban setting, an electric car makes a lot of sense for a delivery driver / uber driver / taxi that is part time and can do a full day of driving on a charge and then charge back to full when at home / work parking, because they excel in stop and start driving without putting as much wear on a vehicle.
Also currently charging at home / work is way cheaper than gasoline (don't worry the feds have a plan to ruin EVERYBODY'S ability to drive without the government totally soaking you with taxes).

BUT, another but, the higher cost of the vehicle negates some of those savings, so you have to push your vehicle to 60k or more before you break even without government subsidies. With government subsidies you may be at break even from mile 0
In my case, my daily commute is $15 in gasoline vs $3.50 in electricity so close to $3k savings per year
If you live in AK or somewhere with a high cost of electricity, it may be actually a lot more expensive to drive an electric car.

Stated, the trip with a shit moving van was 1.7hrs, brand new electric BS car was 2.7 158% more time to get to target
 
P.S. I’m a German car guy so I get it. It’s just a different flavor. Our deal is being overly complicated and leaks oil everywhere
What type of German car?
 
I hope any other car guys caught this and understand it. For a limey Brit car guy to say another car is expensive, inefficient, & time consuming is fucking incredible

P.S. I’m a German car guy so I get it. It’s just a different flavor. Our deal is being overly complicated and leaks oil everywhere
How else are you supposed to know there’s still oil in it? If it’s not leaking add a few quarts
 
Lots of newer German cars come with no dipstick from the factory.
You have to buy one at the parts counter at the dealership.
Yea, not shitting you.
Personally seen it on Audi, BMW, MBZ, and VW.
It looks like there is a dipstick, but it's just a cap with nothing under it.

Here, proof.
 
For my extended travels using any EV I'd easily add 2-3 hours to my trip. They just don't have the range to make me buy any EV.
 
What type of German car?
At this time, none. The last one I drove was a ‘92 Mercedes 300d that’s one of my favorite cars ever. I have a tiny brain worm idea of importing a G-class, specifically a G400 cdi with a twin turbo diesel v8. This will be a forever car that my kids will have to fight over when I depart this world. Another forever car would be a BMW E92 M3 but that’s not as practical as a gelandewagen
How else are you supposed to know there’s still oil in it? If it’s not leaking add a few quarts
Exactly
With her intelligence level......
1661424668334.gif
 
How long was this trip?

Current electric cars are very good about telling you how much range you have left before recharging is required, it sounds like the uber driver was doing a trip that they didn't have the range for. Most of the higher end electric cars have 200 to 350 mile range on a charge depending on the model as well as the driving type.

In some Northern European countries, the charging infrastructure is well built out and convenient to get to, as well as being quick to use.
In the USA decent charging infrastructure is probably a decade away, so Electric cars work best if you can charge them at home / work and have enough range for all your driving on a regular basis. Long trips are just not all that easy to do quickly.

Another side note is that the fast chargers can cost easily two or three times more than charging at home / work which negates much of the savings.

In a more city / urban setting, an electric car makes a lot of sense for a delivery driver / uber driver / taxi that is part time and can do a full day of driving on a charge and then charge back to full when at home / work parking, because they excel in stop and start driving without putting as much wear on a vehicle.
Also currently charging at home / work is way cheaper than gasoline (don't worry the feds have a plan to ruin EVERYBODY'S ability to drive without the government totally soaking you with taxes).

BUT, another but, the higher cost of the vehicle negates some of those savings, so you have to push your vehicle to 60k or more before you break even without government subsidies. With government subsidies you may be at break even from mile 0
In my case, my daily commute is $15 in gasoline vs $3.50 in electricity so close to $3k savings per year
If you live in AK or somewhere with a high cost of electricity, it may be actually a lot more expensive to drive an electric car.
How would they make sense for a delivery driver/uber driver/taxi driver? Save 30k in gas over 10 years, by buying a $100k dollar vehicle instead of a $30k vehicle. I am still not seeing the savings. The only way these retard mobiles make sense is when the tax payer buys it for people. The funniest part has has to be, that people who can't afford them, are paying so people who can afford them can buy them.

I talked to some people trying to drive theirs across the mountains a few weeks back. They were charging every 100-150 miles. When the passes actually have snow and the wether is cold, that will likely be cut in half.
 

How much coal, natural gas, or petroleum is used to generate a kilowatthour of electricity?​


The annual average amounts of coal, natural gas, and petroleum fuels used to generate a kilowatthour (kWh) of electricity by U.S. electric utilities and independent power producers in 2021 were:1

  • Coal–1.12 pounds/kWh
  • Natural gas–7.40 cubic feet/kWh
  • Petroleum liquids–0.08 gallons/kWh
  • Petroleum coke–0.80 pounds/kWh

The petroleum liquids the utilities use has 25-30% more BTU's per volume unit than gasoline.

EV's have battery capacities of 100 kwh plus or minus. 15-20% of kwh is lost during charging. TANSTAAFL.
 
How would they make sense for a delivery driver/uber driver/taxi driver? Save 30k in gas over 10 years, by buying a $100k dollar vehicle instead of a $30k vehicle. I am still not seeing the savings. The only way these retard mobiles make sense is when the tax payer buys it for people. The funniest part has has to be, that people who can't afford them, are paying so people who can afford them can buy them.

I talked to some people trying to drive theirs across the mountains a few weeks back. They were charging every 100-150 miles. When the passes actually have snow and the wether is cold, that will likely be cut in half.

If I was a Uber I’d get a certified used Corolla or Camry

My old boss has a Tesla, he just like it tech and acceleration, for the most part just charges at home, for longer trips hes got a gas SUV, again seems like a novelty car

Now for a old person who lives and has all their friends in a gated community, occasionally goes 5 miles to the store, basically in a setting you could almost get away having a golf cart as your only vehicle, in that case a electric car makes sense, but that’s like 5% of people?
 

That's kind of a special kind of stupid to be an Uber driver and have a vehicle with that little range and agree to take a trip you don't have the range for.
If they paid $60k for less than 200+ miles of range, they are hell of stupid.
 
I know I’m a tard. But what exactly is the reasoning behind oil being finite? I mean… if it’s made via super-compressed organic matter, and millions of life forms are dying all the time day after day, then why would it be limited?
 
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How would they make sense for a delivery driver/uber driver/taxi driver? Save 30k in gas over 10 years, by buying a $100k dollar vehicle instead of a $30k vehicle. I am still not seeing the savings. The only way these retard mobiles make sense is when the tax payer buys it for people. The funniest part has has to be, that people who can't afford them, are paying so people who can afford them can buy them.

I talked to some people trying to drive theirs across the mountains a few weeks back. They were charging every 100-150 miles. When the passes actually have snow and the wether is cold, that will likely be cut in half.
Electric vehicles need not cost $100k. A delivery truck doesn't need to be a Tesla. Neither does a cab. A Tesla is a status symbol, and a vehicle for virtue signaling (pun intended). You can get into a Mustang Mach E for under $50k (I don't care that it isn't a REAL Mustang, it is a real example), and with vehicle prices going the way they are going, the differential between gas and electric is shrinking every year.

In an urban environment, where trips are short, the right EV might make sense. For example, the uber driver is parked in a lot with a charging station. He gets a call and makes the trip, picks up another trip, and maybe another. Heads to a charging station close by to wait for the next trip. Rinse. Repeat. The delivery driver's vehicle is charging while it is loaded. She makes her rounds and heads back to the warehouse for another load. Charge while loading. Hell, if I had the "made in hell" commute from my house to the woodlands (straight through downtown Houston), the round trip would be just over 110 miles per day. Charge at home, charge at work, and have plenty of juice to stop at the grocery store on the way home and get little Timmy to baseball practice. Taxi driver model is similar to uber model. Whether or not EV makes sense really depends on how the vehicle is used and the infrastructure involved. The models above rely on a reasonably well built out urban charging infrastructure. Airports with charging stations in the "cell phone lots." Charging stations at cab stands. Charging stations at places of business and in homes. And, of course, it relies on a grid sufficiently robust to handle the additional load. As someone posted above, we are probably a decade away from that here in the US. Though, we are starting to see more of it. Local businesses with "EV parking" spaces with charging stations. It's not terribly difficult to get a home charger for your EV. Restaurants with charging stations in their parking lots are not uncommon around here either.

For my use, I don't see gas/diesel vs electric as either/or, but as an also proposition. Living within a few miles of our places of work and school, the range of an EV would not be a detractor for a daily driver. Save the gas vehicle for road trips or specialty trips- heavy loads, trailering, etc. Those that say that EV tech just cannot work are Car Fudds (tm).
 
How would they make sense for a delivery driver/uber driver/taxi driver? Save 30k in gas over 10 years, by buying a $100k dollar vehicle instead of a $30k vehicle. I am still not seeing the savings. The only way these retard mobiles make sense is when the tax payer buys it for people. The funniest part has has to be, that people who can't afford them, are paying so people who can afford them can buy them.

I talked to some people trying to drive theirs across the mountains a few weeks back. They were charging every 100-150 miles. When the passes actually have snow and the wether is cold, that will likely be cut in half.

$100k is way more than most would spend at the working level, it's like saying you want to buy a high end luxury gasoline car for your uber business
Most would probably buy a $50k to $60k one and have the government give them $10k as an incentive, (depending on where you live) then it starts making a lot more financial sense. Some states also let EVs drive in HOV lanes or pay less for tolls and such.

There are plenty of good options with a 200+ mile range in the $50k to $60k bracket, which means $40k to $50k if you count in government subsidies.
With the price of a standard new car pushing $30k easily these days, jumping up to $40k IF your use case says that's a good idea, isn't that big of a stretch.

Without the government incentive it's a lot less interesting.
Also you can then possibly get gigs that pay more when virtue signalling folks want to ride carbon free B.S. / carbon free delivery B.S.

Sometimes the government really gets involved in putting their whole foot on the scale.
Even good old Texas was putting out some pretty large incentives on such things (but limited to just enough total slots to make the EPA get off their backs)
 
I know I’m a tard. But what exactly is the reasoning behind oil being finite? I mean… if it’s made via super-compressed organic matter, and millions of life forms are dying all the time day after day, then why would it be limited?
Let's assume that there is a constant rate of super-compressed organic material that is just on the precipice of converting to petroleum. Let's also assume that there is a constant rate of consumption of the petroleum that is available. If the rate of replenishment is lower than the rate of consumption, then eventually supply does not meet demand. This is super-simplistic, but the concept is sound.

There is also the factor of recovery cost. It is not necessarily that the oil is not in the ground, but that it cost more to pump it than it can be sold for, so no reason to go after it. This is especially true for natural gas, where a good well may be capped because the NG price is just too low to support recovery from the well.

Beyond that, there is the very complex phenomena that allows for organic material to become petroleum. It is not nearly so simple as putting a body in the ground and waiting a million years.
 
I know I’m a tard. But what exactly is the reasoning behind oil being finite? I mean… if it’s made via super-compressed organic matter, and millions of life forms are dying all the time day after day, then why would it be limited?

That is a question that is up for a bit of debate.
The general theory is that it takes a very long time and lots of pressure / warmth etc, to turn those dead animals into oil.

However they have been saying we are at peak oil for decades now and every time oil production gets new technologies and keeps going up slightly.

So the issue is nobody really knows how much oil exactly there is or where it is all at and then it's not clear how long it takes for new oil to get made or if that can be done on a human type time scale, or without cataclysmic events.

You could technically make hydrocarbons out of garbage or even using a lot of air but those are hugely energy inefficient.

So who knows how long the oil will last, but my guess is if it does start to run out, it WON'T be some big crazy sudden thing, rather it will be slow enough that we'll have plenty of notice it is happening and we can decide which way to go based on technology.
 
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Hell, if I had the "made in hell" commute from my house to the woodlands (straight through downtown Houston), the round trip would be just over 110 miles per day. Charge at home, charge at work, and have plenty of juice to stop at the grocery store on the way home and get little Timmy to baseball practice. Taxi driver model is similar to uber model. Whether or not EV makes sense really depends on how the vehicle is used and the infrastructure involved.

Not far off from how my commute is daily and doing just that works well and saves me money not using gasoline.

It's not terribly difficult to get a home charger for your EV.

You can just unplug your dryer at home and plug in your charger if it's in a convenient spot.
Then later on you can get around to having a dedicated socket put in or a device hard wired.

At work if you have 208 / 240 in a convenient location with like an L6-30 or similar that you can run a generator cable from, you can plug into that.

Decent chargers are in the $400 to $800 range depending on the model & features and what's on sale.
 
You could technically make hydrocarbons out of garbage or even using a lot of air but those are hugely energy inefficient.
Scroll down about 1/2 way to "Collecting and Treating Landfill Gas..."
 
That's kind of a special kind of stupid to be an Uber driver and have a vehicle with that little range and agree to take a trip you don't have the range for.
If they paid $60k for less than 200+ miles of range, they are hell of stupid.

🤷‍♂️

Was a Kia, not sure the details, but yeah seems a shitty vehicle for that mission for sure
 
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Electric vehicles need not cost $100k. A delivery truck doesn't need to be a Tesla. Neither does a cab. A Tesla is a status symbol, and a vehicle for virtue signaling (pun intended). You can get into a Mustang Mach E for under $50k (I don't care that it isn't a REAL Mustang, it is a real example), and with vehicle prices going the way they are going, the differential between gas and electric is shrinking every year.

In an urban environment, where trips are short, the right EV might make sense. For example, the uber driver is parked in a lot with a charging station. He gets a call and makes the trip, picks up another trip, and maybe another. Heads to a charging station close by to wait for the next trip. Rinse. Repeat. The delivery driver's vehicle is charging while it is loaded. She makes her rounds and heads back to the warehouse for another load. Charge while loading. Hell, if I had the "made in hell" commute from my house to the woodlands (straight through downtown Houston), the round trip would be just over 110 miles per day. Charge at home, charge at work, and have plenty of juice to stop at the grocery store on the way home and get little Timmy to baseball practice. Taxi driver model is similar to uber model. Whether or not EV makes sense really depends on how the vehicle is used and the infrastructure involved. The models above rely on a reasonably well built out urban charging infrastructure. Airports with charging stations in the "cell phone lots." Charging stations at cab stands. Charging stations at places of business and in homes. And, of course, it relies on a grid sufficiently robust to handle the additional load. As someone posted above, we are probably a decade away from that here in the US. Though, we are starting to see more of it. Local businesses with "EV parking" spaces with charging stations. It's not terribly difficult to get a home charger for your EV. Restaurants with charging stations in their parking lots are not uncommon around here either.

For my use, I don't see gas/diesel vs electric as either/or, but as an also proposition. Living within a few miles of our places of work and school, the range of an EV would not be a detractor for a daily driver. Save the gas vehicle for road trips or specialty trips- heavy loads, trailering, etc. Those that say that EV tech just cannot work are Car Fudds (tm).
Whether an EV makes sense also depends on longevity and reliability too. What happens to that EV uber driver when there are rolling black outs? What happens when his batteries go down after two years. What happens when its zero degrees?

The problem is and I bet always will be the batteries. They don't last. I do know a guy that is on his second Tesla now. Both had their batteries replaced in the first year. He said they are great about replacing them.

Push all that to the side, and tell me, how much more excessive was electricity than gas say 3 years ago? Why are gas vehicle prices rising? Why is a sedan that was 12k in 2010, 25k in 2022. A nice sedan is still 20k less than an E-mustang. The answer is the same reason there isn't going to be electricity for electric cars. Government interference, and it is destroying our energy infrastructure, likely purposefully.
 
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That is a question that is up for a bit of debate.
The general theory is that it takes a very long time and lots of pressure / warmth etc, to turn those dead animals into oil.

However they have been saying we are at peak oil for decades now and every time oil production gets new technologies and keeps going up slightly.

So the issue is nobody really knows how much oil exactly there is or where it is all at and then it's not clear how long it takes for new oil to get made or if that can be done on a human type time scale, or without cataclysmic events.

You could technically make hydrocarbons out of garbage or even using a lot of air but those are hugely energy inefficient.

So who knows how long the oil will last, but my guess is if it does start to run out, it WON'T be some big crazy sudden thing, rather it will be slow enough that we'll have plenty of notice it is happening and we can decide which way to go based on technology.
Its also not clear if oil is actually a "fossil fuel," I.E made of dead things. Or made by some other processes.
 
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Whether an EV makes sense also depends on longevity and reliability too. What happens to that EV uber driver when there are rolling black outs? What happens when his batteries go down after two years. What happens when its zero degrees?

The problem is and I bet always will be the batteries. They don't last. I do know a guy that is on his second Tesla now. Both had their batteries replaced in the first year. He said they are great about replacing them.

Push all that to the side, and tell me, how much more excessive was electricity than gas say 3 years ago? Why are gas vehicle prices rising? Why is a sedan that was 12k in 2010, 25k in 2022. A nice sedan is still 20k less than an E-mustang. The answer is the same reason there isn't going to be electricity for electric cars. Government interference, and it is destroying our energy infrastructure, likely purposefully.

You can get a plenty reliable older car that gets good mileage and can drive across the nation for $5k, not sure the same can be said for a electric
 
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How much coal, natural gas, or petroleum is used to generate a kilowatthour of electricity?​


The annual average amounts of coal, natural gas, and petroleum fuels used to generate a kilowatthour (kWh) of electricity by U.S. electric utilities and independent power producers in 2021 were:1

  • Coal–1.12 pounds/kWh
  • Natural gas–7.40 cubic feet/kWh
  • Petroleum liquids–0.08 gallons/kWh
  • Petroleum coke–0.80 pounds/kWh

The petroleum liquids the utilities use has 25-30% more BTU's per volume unit than gasoline.

EV's have battery capacities of 100 kwh plus or minus. 15-20% of kwh is lost during charging. TANSTAAFL.
So here's a chart from 2020. Let's assume for arguments sake it hasn't changed a great deal.

us-primARY-ENERGY-CONSUMPTION.jpg


So "renewable" energy only accounts for 12% of electrical generation. Let's round it up to 20% for the most recent 2 years. So if you want your EV's to really be "green" you'd need to eliminate the other 80% of electrical generation fuel sources. How do you do that AND increase the grid load required by EV's and keep up with both the new EV demand as well as regular electrical demand? You have to increase renewable by 80%?

You can ask a child if this concept is feasible and he'd be able to give you the correct answer. This isn't even taking into consideration upgrading the existing grid infrastructure and not mentioning upgrades to sub standard installations that were never designed to handle the increased loads.

I'm not against renewable energy sources, as I'm not foolish enough to believe carbon based fuels will last forever. Electrical power should be used in capacities where it makes sense. It sure as he'll isn't in vehicles, trucks, tractor trailers, or heavy equipment.

With any discussion, controversy, what have you ALWAYS FOLLOW THE MONEY. There's more truth in that than anyone will speak about in public.
 
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I
So here's a chart from 2020. Let's assume for arguments sake it hasn't changed a great deal.

View attachment 7941726

So "renewable" energy only accounts for 12% of electrical generation. Let's round it up to 20% for the most recent 2 years. So if you want your EV's to really be "green" you'd need to eliminate the other 80% of electrical generation fuel sources. How do you do that AND increase the grid load required by EV's and keep up with both the new EV demand as well as regular electrical demand? You have to increase renewable by 80%?

You can ask a child if this concept is feasible and he'd be able to give you the correct answer. This isn't even taking into consideration upgrading the existing grid infrastructure and not mentioning upgrades to sub standard installations that were never designed to handle the increased loads.

I'm not against renewable energy sources, as I'm not foolish enough to believe carbon based fuels will last forever. Electrical power should be used in capacities where it makes sense. It sure as he'll isn't in vehicles, trucks, tractor trailers, or heavy equipment.

With any discussion, controversy, what have you ALWAYS FOLLOW THE MONEY. There's more truth in that than anyone will speak about in public.

It’s also funny, all the news (including fox) are talking about how Germany is in a bad spot without Russian energy, they don’t mention why they arnt independent, they went balls deep into “green energy”, yeah how’s that shit working out for them 😂
 
I know I’m a tard. But what exactly is the reasoning behind oil being finite? I mean… if it’s made via super-compressed organic matter, and millions of life forms are dying all the time day after day, then why would it be limited?
Oil is not finite at all. In a pond with just a few surface acres we can grow enough algae to harvest a continuous stream of oil, without killing the algae. That brand new oil does not contain the impurities found in the millions of year old subterranean oil, and so does not require refining.
The carbon cycle for such farmed oil is a closed loop.
 
You could technically make hydrocarbons out of garbage or even using a lot of air but those are hugely energy inefficient.
The landfills are constantly emitting methane ... it's collected or mostly burned off. WM used to compress the methane and use it to refuel a few of their trucks ... the problem is that it is a very dirty gas compared to CNG/LNG.

They also use(d) the methane to power some of the WTE plants.
 
First off, no fucking way am I going to spend more on a vehicle than I spent on my house and 10 acres.

Second, I plan on going the opposite direction. I want to find another old Chevy pickup with a carb and manual transmission.

Take that and stick it where the sun don't shine, Occasional Cortex.
 
The US guv has no money that it does not confiscate by force.

They have no business subsidizing something that is not financially viable on it's own merits.

For that matter, they shouldn't subsidize anything.