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Tikka T3 Thread

Thanks for the suggestion(s)! I'll be looking into those, and I had my eye on a Javelin bipod as well.

Going to the range on Thursday to get it sighted in and I'll play around with it to see what else I might need.
Get a triad stock pack

Non permanent, adjustable and it doesn't look stupid like the shitty amazon kydex ones. No drilling holes either.
Plus it adds utility with the pouch. Only like 50 bucks to boot.
Nothing says broke ass quite like one of those kydex risers. And when you go to sell the stock once you upgrade (you will), no one will want it due to the 2 holes you drilled in it.
 
Here's a few of my tikkas
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So about today.
Tikka TacA1 barreled action.
KRG
NF ATACR
Atlas bipod
Silencerco
168 smk fgmm

Bought the BA here. The chassis is a blem. The scope is an older MilR I had. The suppressor is for my hunting rig.
These are a couple of the average 3 shot groups from today.

It’s stupid how accurate this rifle is.

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I too have had them do the job. Their process in the past was pretty seemless, especially if you catch them at a gun show. The results were very nice.

The only thing to watch out for is if you have a rimfire. They cut the threads too long for my TBAC 22. I didn’t realize rimfire threads are typically cut shorter! So I was forced to source a quality spacer.

Heads up for whomever you choose on that one.
Just for reference since your issue has been discussed and answered, the work silencer central did on my marlin xt22 fit my Mask fine without a spacer.
 
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Just for reference since your issue has been discussed and answered, the work silencer central did on my marlin xt22 fit my Mask fine without a spacer.
I think the TBAC Takedown 22 is more picky about the length of the threaded barrel vs other RF cans.

How long are the threads on your barrel?

So, I read somewhere that the reason for having different length threads for rimfire vs centerfire is to theoretically prevent someone accidentally threading on a rimfire can (~.4” threaded part) on a centerfire (~.6”).

Of course this could be total bunk. Sounds like many rimfire cans can be threaded on a .6” long thread anyway.
 
Just bought my first Tilka T3x Lite in 300 Win Mag. It is the Cabelas special. I took it to the range today for load development and found a large accuracy node that is .6 grains. Those four grouping were one hole. This is by far the easiest load development I have ever done. Next is too load up some rounds and test SD. All I added to the rifle is a limb saver air tech recoil pad. The recoil pad combined with the muzzle break made for a soft shooting magnum. At lest soft to me. lol.
 
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Does anyone know where a guy can buy a Sterk bolt handle? I know you used to be able to message him on here, but he hasn't posted in almost a year.
 
Not sterk, but anarchy outdoors has a swept handle. That's what I'm using
I'm aware of the Anarchy. It's not quite right to me. If I can't buy a Sterk I might have to see if I can borrow one and have a local machinist friend make me a few copies.
 
I'm aware of the Anarchy. It's not quite right to me. If I can't buy a Sterk I might have to see if I can borrow one and have a local machinist friend make me a few copies.
Is there any word that sterk isn't making them? IIRC, he's always been on a bit of a back-order basis...
 
Got 20 minutes last week to run to the free range and get the rifle sighted in. First 5 rounds through the gun, using the cheap Winchester power point 129 grain.

I'd love to say putting two rounds in the same hole was skill, but it was rounds #3 and 5.

Picked up some Horandy ELD match and a lead sled to hopefully get it completely dialed in.

53517505913_891968c500_b.jpg


53517505933_dce8a614cf_b.jpg
 
Have any of you Tikka guys taken a 5rd magazine for a CTR and made some modification so it'll act and perform like a 10rd mag? I only ask because I'd like to get another couple mags, but all I can find are 5rd. Is it a different follower, a dent in the metal body or something else that makes the differences?
 
Now that hunting season is over in Alabama, It's time to play Tikka Legos...
I'm thinking that I want to pull the .284 Winchester barrel off of my main T3X Action and swap either the 6mm CM or the 6.5 CM Barrel onto the action and put it back into the MDT ACC Chassis for the spring & summer.
I could put it back into the manners CF hunting stock, but once you run a chassis gun that's adjusted to fit, it's tough to go back to conventional.
Anyone have any opinions ?
 
Now that hunting season is over in Alabama, It's time to play Tikka Legos...
I'm thinking that I want to pull the .284 Winchester barrel off of my main T3X Action and swap either the 6mm CM or the 6.5 CM Barrel onto the action and put it back into the MDT ACC Chassis for the spring & summer.
I could put it back into the manners CF hunting stock, but once you run a chassis gun that's adjusted to fit, it's tough to go back to conventional.
Anyone have any opinions ?
My opinion is that you have far too many parts and pieces for one rifle cluttering up your home. P.M. me and I'll give you an address to dispose of all the extra parts. Your wife will thank you.
 
My opinion is that you have far too many parts and pieces for one rifle cluttering up your home. P.M. me and I'll give you an address to dispose of all the extra parts. Your wife will thank you.
Would it make you feel any better if I told you that I have those parts from 3 different T3 / T3X and a T1X rifles ?
I started this "Collection" in 2018 so it's not a recent thing.
I'm a "Poor" that pays over time.
 
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Would it make you feel any better if I told you that I have those parts from 3 different T3 / T3X and a T1X rifles ?
I started this "Collection" in 2018 so it's not a recent thing.
I'm a "Poor" that pays over time.
I get it. I'm a "poor " who has no problem saving for years to buy top dollar stuff.
 
I get it. I'm a "poor " who has no problem saving for years to buy top dollar stuff.

Shit half the dudes on this site have maxed out credit cards and $1k/month truck payments. Ain’t nothing wrong with saving a little cash to spend a little cash even if it takes longer to get what you want.
 
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Now that hunting season is over in Alabama, It's time to play Tikka Legos...
I'm thinking that I want to pull the .284 Winchester barrel off of my main T3X Action and swap either the 6mm CM or the 6.5 CM Barrel onto the action and put it back into the MDT ACC Chassis for the spring & summer.
I could put it back into the manners CF hunting stock, but once you run a chassis gun that's adjusted to fit, it's tough to go back to conventional.
Anyone have any opinions ?
I pulled the .284 Barrel off of the action today at lunch and replaced it with the 6.5 CM CTR barrel that came off of this action.
It's so much easier to do a barrel change now that the barrel that was installed by Magilla Gorilla in Finland has been removed.
It took longer to set up the barrel vice on the milling machine table than to do the actual barrel change.
I'll put the BA in the ACC tomorrow and remount the scope with a new pair of rings and laser bore sight it, then install the suppressor mount and it's ready to go to the range .
I need to load up some more 142 SMK's and shoot more stuff at longer ranges.
 
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Got 20 minutes last week to run to the free range and get the rifle sighted in. First 5 rounds through the gun, using the cheap Winchester power point 129 grain.

I'd love to say putting two rounds in the same hole was skill, but it was rounds #3 and 5.

Picked up some Horandy ELD match and a lead sled to hopefully get it completely dialed in.

53517505913_891968c500_b.jpg


53517505933_dce8a614cf_b.jpg

Leave the Lead Sled at home.

It works great as something to hold your gun during cleaning the barrel.
It is a horrible choice for a shooting rest, however.

An elevated check pad may be helpful with your particular scope height.
 
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Leave the Lead Sled at home.

It works great as something to hold your gun during cleaning the barrel.
It is a horrible choice for a shooting rest, however.

An elevated check pad may be helpful with your particular scope height.
Where’s the Lead Sled? He’s using two sand bags. They work just fine. (Maybe I missed something?)

I agree that Lead Sleds suck.
 
Third sentence of his post....
Goddamnit lol I read the post three times and missed it. D’oh!

Yes, do not buy a POS lead sled.

The biggest recoil-control tip I’ve learned is to not place the rifle butt in the spot everyone thinks is the shoulder pocket.

Frank says to place it over your collar bone, closer to the centerline of your body (still confusingly calls it the shoulder pocket though). Right under the outer edge of your jaw where the collarbone dives back into your upper torso.

I know it sounds daft, but the closer to the centerline you get the less torque is applied to your torso and the more straight back the recoil becomes.

And square your shoulders to the target. Do not jut your left shoulder out front (if you are right-handed).

Spending the cash on his online classes is the best money I ever spent on learning to shoot.
 
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Leave the Lead Sled at home.

It works great as something to hold your gun during cleaning the barrel.
It is a horrible choice for a shooting rest, however.

An elevated check pad may be helpful with your particular scope height.

I don't know if it makes much difference, but I had purchased a Caldwell shooting rest (so not a "real" lead sled?), not something that gets weighted down. My intention was to use it to assist in getting as close to a "perfect" zero on the Tikka and my AR. I did also think of it as being handy for cleaning, so a dual purpose purchase.

The way I figured it was, get the zero right and make sure my equipment is on point using the Caldwell rest, and then when I start shooting with a bipod or free hand I'll know where MY skills are lacking, rather than questioning whether or not my zero was on.

Or is that a silly way of looking at it? And that's a genuine question, not me being snarky
 
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Problem with the lead sled and other one-piece shooting rests is that any disturbance at one end gets transferred instantly to the other end, magnifying said disturbance in the process. Recoil is a pretty big disturbance.

So, even though your aim is very precise, the result leaves much to be desired.
 
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Your zero will change from said shooting rest, to a standing zero, to a kneeling zero, to a prone zero. You can eventually work it out with training or practice, but the guns zero off a rest is not my zero, is not your zero, etc... you get the idea.

Shoot your zero prone for load development as it is the easiest to reproduce and is most stable, and then rezero your ammo in the position you think you are most likely to be shooting from most of the time and try to train yourself to maintain that zero in all the different positions you think you will shoot from. My .03 cents
 
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I don't know if it makes much difference, but I had purchased a Caldwell shooting rest (so not a "real" lead sled?), not something that gets weighted down. My intention was to use it to assist in getting as close to a "perfect" zero on the Tikka and my AR. I did also think of it as being handy for cleaning, so a dual purpose purchase.

The way I figured it was, get the zero right and make sure my equipment is on point using the Caldwell rest, and then when I start shooting with a bipod or free hand I'll know where MY skills are lacking, rather than questioning whether or not my zero was on.

Or is that a silly way of looking at it? And that's a genuine question, not me being snarky


The Caldwell Lead Sled that I am accustomed to have a pocket that provides a firm rear stop for the rifle.
It transfers all of the recoil into the rifle.....hammering it.

I've seen wooden stocked magnum sporter weight hunting rifles have significant stock damage from these things.


Now, the free standing Caldwell shooting rest that allows a separate rear bag that supports the stock is fine as it allows the rifle to move with the recoil. Your body absorbs the recoil more than the stock.
 
Wanting to add a cheekrest cover pad to a soon to arrive T3X TAC A1 (in the factory chassis).


I see where Wiebad offers one, but have been unable to find pics anywhere of it on a TAC A1.


Searched through this thread but didn’t see any.


Anyone using a Wiebad or other pad on their TAC A1 ?
 
I don't know if it makes much difference, but I had purchased a Caldwell shooting rest (so not a "real" lead sled?), not something that gets weighted down. My intention was to use it to assist in getting as close to a "perfect" zero on the Tikka and my AR. I did also think of it as being handy for cleaning, so a dual purpose purchase.

The way I figured it was, get the zero right and make sure my equipment is on point using the Caldwell rest, and then when I start shooting with a bipod or free hand I'll know where MY skills are lacking, rather than questioning whether or not my zero was on.

Or is that a silly way of looking at it? And that's a genuine question, not me being snarky
Will give you a wrong zero when you are in the field, as recoil affects your point of impact, and you will not deal with recoil the same as with that lead sled or similar.
Use bipod or bags, if that what you use in the field.
 
Got 20 minutes last week to run to the free range and get the rifle sighted in. First 5 rounds through the gun, using the cheap Winchester power point 129 grain.

I'd love to say putting two rounds in the same hole was skill, but it was rounds #3 and 5.

Picked up some Horandy ELD match and a lead sled to hopefully get it completely dialed in.

53517505913_891968c500_b.jpg


53517505933_dce8a614cf_b.jpg
Looking at your target and making some suggestions. I think there's a reasonably good chance that gun loves that ammo. If you get two shots in one hole it is rarely on accident, but meaning rather a sign of the gods that something is lining up right between your gun and the ammo, and you as a shooter. I'd bet that is a half minute gun or better!

Round 2 lines up perfectly with your vertical of the two shots in the bullseye and round 4 lines up perfectly with the two in the bull laterally. Shot 1 might be a fluke. It seems like there are reasons for the position of rounds 2 and 4 relative to the one hole groups of 3 and 5.

I'd try some more of that ammo and practice your fundamentals. I'd wager the more you shoot that gun the better your groups will get.

If I were a bettin' man I would also wager your left shoulder tends to be positioned forward of your right sometimes, which would explain when your point of impacts is left of your point of aim. Try and keep you shoulders square and perpendicular to the gun when it's pointing at your target and that should largely go away. Also try keeping the butt of the rifle as close to your midline of your collar bone as you can allow. The shoulder pocket is really good for hitting left of targets also and shant be used without VERY much consideration. Hitting low probably means your gun isn't well enough supported on the butt stock with your rear bag when the rifle is shouldered up. If possible try compressing the bag under the gun so the butt stock can't go anywhere while you have it shouldered firmly to your body.
 
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The Caldwell Lead Sled that I am accustomed to have a pocket that provides a firm rear stop for the rifle.
It transfers all of the recoil into the rifle.....hammering it.

I've seen wooden stocked magnum sporter weight hunting rifles have significant stock damage from these things.


Now, the free standing Caldwell shooting rest that allows a separate rear bag that supports the stock is fine as it allows the rifle to move with the recoil. Your body absorbs the recoil more than the stock.

So I had bought this one thinking that because the stock would still be shouldered that it would be more acceptable? I do plan on getting a bipod for the rifle at some point here. My thinking was that if the front is just resting on something extremely stable (even more so that a bipod), and the gun is free to recoil back and transfer most of that energy to my shoulder, that it would be an easier/more accurate zero without "hurting" the gun or optic.

53538901421_58bd60ef23.jpg


Looking at your target and making some suggestions. I think there's a reasonably good chance that gun loves that ammo. If you get two shots in one hole it is rarely on accident, but meaning rather a sign of the gods that something is lining up right between your gun and the ammo, and you as a shooter. I'd bet that is a half minute gun or better!

Round 2 lines up perfectly with your vertical of the two shots in the bullseye and round 4 lines up perfectly with the two in the bull laterally. Shot 1 might be a fluke. It seems like there are reasons for the position of rounds 2 and 4 relative to the one hole groups of 3 and 5.

I'd try some more of that ammo and practice your fundamentals. I'd wager the more you shoot that gun the better your groups will get.

If I were a bettin' man I would also wager your left shoulder tends to be positioned forward of your right sometimes, which would explain when your point of impacts is left of your point of aim. Try and keep you shoulders square and perpendicular to the gun when it's pointing at your target and that should largely go away. Also try keeping the butt of the rifle as close to your midline of your collar bone as you can allow. The shoulder pocket is really good for hitting left of targets also and shant be used without VERY much consideration. Hitting low probably means your gun isn't well enough supported on the butt stock with your rear bag when the rifle is shouldered up. If possible try compressing the bag under the gun so the butt stock can't go anywhere while you have it shouldered firmly to your body.

Thanks for taking the time to write that all out, I'm still absolutely brand new and reading up on the basic fundamentals. I'm still clueless on body positioning, etc..
 
So I had bought this one thinking that because the stock would still be shouldered that it would be more acceptable? I do plan on getting a bipod for the rifle at some point here. My thinking was that if the front is just resting on something extremely stable (even more so that a bipod), and the gun is free to recoil back and transfer most of that energy to my shoulder, that it would be an easier/more accurate zero without "hurting" the gun or optic.

53538901421_58bd60ef23.jpg




Thanks for taking the time to write that all out, I'm still absolutely brand new and reading up on the basic fundamentals. I'm still clueless on body positioning, etc..
That should be much less damaging than the Lead Sled models.
I'd probably place some type of cloth or towel between the rear rest and the stock in hopes that it would allow the stock and easier movement under recoil by making that rear less "grippy"





When I'm using sporter weight hunting rifles:


I picked up a Caldwell rest that is really steady....but man that thing is a beast to tote around.

All steel...or mostly steel.

Flexibility to use a variety of front & rear bags.

Very economical, too.



Image 4.jpeg





One of these may be almost as good and much, much easier to carry.
Mainly polymer. Can use any rear bag that works for you.


Image 5.jpeg


When hunting, most of my shots either find me resting the front stock over a padded shooting rail (similar feel to the rests above), off shooting sticks or using the sling.


I'll be the first to admit that I've not practiced near enough with the sling over the years.

It told on me, too.
 
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Basically get a sturdy front rest and a seperate rear bag. They should not be attached to each other. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. Enough of the world's best F-class and benchrest shooters use it to prove it works.

One-piece rests are for so-called rail guns. Specifically designed stocks to fit specifically designed rests. All these other rests are well-designed and marketed to seperate you from your money.
 
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Here’s my progression, if it’s any help:
  1. Bald Eagle slingshot front rest and a Protektor rabbit ear rear bag. Bald Eagle is now made by Grizzly. Cumbersome.
  2. 14lbs X-shaped “sandbag” (actually full of polypropylene re-grind) and various rear squeeze bags. Still use this setup for pdog shooting, but thinking of transitioning as it’s heavy.
  3. Various bipods and I’ve settled on the “Compromise” rear bag from our very own Mark Taylor, aka @Enough Said. You might need one of his other height bags…you’ll have a box full of various rear bags as you need to find what works for you.

Why I am transitioning to bipods for most range work is that they are light. I am also finding I might shoot better with them. I only shoot from a bench or a tripod, btw.

For bipods I would recommend:
  • Atlas CAL for a simple well-made bipod, but by design it doesn’t totally lock off the cant
  • Any LRA bipod as they are carbon fiber (light, nice on the hands in the winter) and do offer total cant lock-off. Wide bipods won’t fit in your case when attached, if that’s important. I own the Lite-Tactical F-Class for heavy rigs.
  • Elite Iron non-panning model. This is the best bipod out there, but might be hard to fit on multiple rifles without buying more adapters. I own the panner for varmints, but it has some transportation challenges if left attached as it doesn’t have a pan lock off.
Do read up on bipod technique. It’s much different than using a sandbag or benchrest-type rest. And also read up on how to use the rear squeeze bag.
 
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Finally.picked up my ctr, planning on shooting it for a few weeks and then putting it in either a krg bravo, or xray. I'm able to get very good prices on both so does it all come down yo personal preference? I'm leaning towards the xray right now.

Thanks much for any input
 
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Finally.picked up my ctr, planning on shooting it for a few weeks and then putting it in either a krg bravo, or xray. I'm able to get very good prices on both so does it all come down yo personal preference? I'm leaning towards the xray right now.

Thanks much for any input


Congrats on the new rifle. (y)
 
Here’s my progression, if it’s any help:
  1. Bald Eagle slingshot front rest and a Protektor rabbit ear rear bag. Bald Eagle is now made by Grizzly. Cumbersome.
  2. 14lbs X-shaped “sandbag” (actually full of polypropylene re-grind) and various rear squeeze bags. Still use this setup for pdog shooting, but thinking of transitioning as it’s heavy.
  3. Various bipods and I’ve settled on the “Compromise” rear bag from our very own Mark Taylor, aka @Enough Said. You might need one of his other height bags…you’ll have a box full of various rear bags as you need to find what works for you.

Why I am transitioning to bipods for most range work is that they are light. I am also finding I might shoot better with them. I only shoot from a bench or a tripod, btw.

For bipods I would recommend:
  • Atlas CAL for a simple well-made bipod, but by design it doesn’t totally lock off the cant
  • Any LRA bipod as they are carbon fiber (light, nice on the hands in the winter) and do offer total cant lock-off. Wide bipods won’t fit in your case when attached, if that’s important. I own the Lite-Tactical F-Class for heavy rigs.
  • Elite Iron non-panning model. This is the best bipod out there, but might be hard to fit on multiple rifles without buying more adapters. I own the panner for varmints, but it has some transportation challenges if left attached as it doesn’t have a pan lock off.
Do read up on bipod technique. It’s much different than using a sandbag or benchrest-type rest. And also read up on how to use the rear squeeze bag.





Recently picked up some of those very rear bags from The Guru. :)

Picked up the small-medium-large trio.

Looking forward to getting the to the range and giving them a test run.

IMG_2535.jpeg
 
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