Night Vision What Counterweight with dual PVS-14's

Delta4-3

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May 21, 2013
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I run two Glock 19 mags. It is not near as bulky as it looks in the pictures. I am not a fan of dead weight. It isn't bad if you are just hunting with minimal gear, but I have etched in my mind the reminders of how bad it sucks to carry extra stuff.
YKLQk1b.jpg


Also, here is a new Night Combat Solutions exclusive counterweight at 9.6oz. To stick with the theme of actual usable weight, it holds 8 AA batteries. It has Velcro on the back and loops to use bungees or other methods of securing.
9XqsDuH.jpg
 

datsthat

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Mar 24, 2014
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I run two Glock 19 mags. It is not near as bulky as it looks in the pictures. I am not a fan of dead weight. It isn't bad if you are just hunting with minimal gear, but I have etched in my mind the reminders of how bad it sucks to carry extra stuff.
YKLQk1b.jpg


Also, here is a new Night Combat Solutions exclusive counterweight at 9.6oz. To stick with the theme of actual usable weight, it holds 8 AA batteries. It has Velcro on the back and loops to use bungees or other methods of securing.
9XqsDuH.jpg

Looks great. What's the cost? Do you have a website?
 

JPShooter

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Saw this thread and had to take a look at was is going on today in the world of NVG's.

It's a bit of a trip down memory lane you see, as I graduated from US Army flight school in 1980. The Army was just in the early days of flying with goggles. They were full face goggles (a padded leather "muff" wrapped around your face like a giant pair of glasses) and they weighed quite a bit. We modified the head strap to snaps and Velcro on our flight helmets. Like I see you guys doing we had bags with weights velcro'd to the back of the helmet, and we started out just using lots of tire weights. I can't remember exactly what the whole rig weighed, but we knew that if we hit hard enough we would likely break our necks. And we were doing engine at idle full touchdown autorotations in those days. It was an absolute hoot!

The technology is so much better these days. They even get two engines now!! :)
 
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Delta4-3

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Looks great. What's the cost? Do you have a website?

It will probably be in the $25ish range, there are some upgrades being made as we speak. They are 100% American made. I just transferred the domain name last Thursday to put the website up. I have zero computer knowledge, but it sounds like its a quick process from there. And if anyone had an email bounce in the last week or so, it's because I am an idiot. It took me 5 days to realize that if you transfer your domain, there is a good chance your email account won't work. It's back up now.
 

I^2 Technologies - Peter

I^2 Technologies - Peter
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Jun 26, 2002
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Saw this thread and had to take a look at was is going on today in the world of NVG's.

It's a bit of a trip down memory lane you see, as I graduated from US Army flight school in 1980. The Army was just in the early days of flying with goggles. They were full face goggles (a padded leather "muff" wrapped around your face like a giant pair of glasses) and they weighed quite a bit. We modified the head strap to snaps and Velcro on our flight helmets. Like I see you guys doing we had bags with weights velcro'd to the back of the helmet, and we started out just using lots of tire weights. I can't remember exactly what the whole rig weighed, but we knew that if we hit hard enough we would likely break our necks. And we were doing engine at idle full touchdown autorotations in those days. It was an absolute hoot!

The technology is so much better these days. They even get two engines now!! :)

BAH HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA ! ! ! Two Engines... twice the weight and all the potential to fail just the same... Wait was that my cynical outside voice?

One of my First jobs in the Marine Corps (circa 1987) was to modify PVS-5s for use on the old SPH flight helmet. Indeed a trip down memory lane, your post brought back the memories. I however think they kids today are using fishing weights in little pouches sewn up by Flight E as counter weights and Auto rotation is one of the fucking scariest things out there! You sir are a steely-eyed daredevil!

About 1Lb 6 ounces seems to be perfect for use with Dual 14s.
 

I^2 Technologies - Peter

I^2 Technologies - Peter
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How was life in the late Cretaceous period you guys?

Woodland cammies, M-65 field jackets (green in the MC for many years), Alice packs, LC-2 field Gear, PASGT Armor and helmets and hey the Marine Corps had just gotten progressive, we were sporting M16-A2s and had the First AV8-Bs. Still had to float mostly on LPHs but I got to go on a NEWER LHA (USS Tarawa) for my first Westpac. Russian Fishing trollers with toooooooooo many antennas shadowed the battle groups and big excitement was when AV8-Bs chased the Bear Bombers away.

On the night vision front the BIG deal was the intro of the ANVIS 6 in 1990! It was huge! In fact, on our way sailing to the first gulf war we were aboard something called a TAVB (USNS CURTIS) sailing from the west coat to the Persian gulf. When We left Singapore we had to transit the straights of Sumatra and deal with Sumatran Pirates. Yes Pirates as in ARG!!! Pirates. We took 100 mile an hour tape and taped the ANVIS SPH Visors to our PASGT helmets and rubber banded the battery packs onto the back of our helmets for the night watchs. Good times for everyone!
 
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JPShooter

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How was life in the late Cretaceous period you guys?

:)

Yeah, I resemble that remark I guess!

You know your getting older when one of the aircraft that you flew (and I mean THE actual aircraft) is in the Army Aviation Museum. The funny thing is, we delivered that aircraft to the museum about 20 years ago.

I too remember getting ANVIS 6's for Desert Storm, they were indeed a step forward. Our crew members in the back had 5's and they did not like us busting across the desert on the deck when the ambient was too low for them to see squat!

And as far as two engines goes, a dual engine failure is very rare and likely fuel or air contaminant related. Twin engine aircraft are way more than twice as reliable.